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Full text of "Ranger"



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The Ranger 



presents Regis 



on the crest of the west 





where the yet Unfinished Man is advanced on the road to completion; 
where the raw material of a young man is forged 
into the man of tomorrow — 

through the efforts of his teachers in the classroom; . . . 



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through his living in close association with many 
other men, his fellow students, and through the tolerance 

he learns toward other men, their manners, and their ideals; 




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through the activities of a social nature in 

which he engages and through the poise he gains thereby; 




Page 4 




through the spiritual guidance and grace 
he derives from his religious practices; 



through the hours of study in his room; 



through his meeting with many men from diverse 
backgrounds and of diverse interests and through the 

experience he acquires from their varied walks in life; 



Page 6 




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through the whole of living and going to school, whether 

he lives at home or on campus, in a private room or in a houseful 



of students; .... 



Page 8 





. . . through the college itself, with its administrators and its 

faculty, its priests and its laymen, its buildings and its grounds, 



its atmosphere and its ideals; .... 




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through the magnitude of creation, a small pan 
of which he sees, and the knowledge he attains there- 
from of his own place in creation, and of his 
purpose in life and his final end; .... 




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in short, through the whole wonderful and inspiring 
time of his life called "college" wherein he increases 

in his love for God, his love for his fellow man, and 



his love for beauty in truth. 



Page 13 




The 



RAN 



REGIS COLLEGE - 



DENVER 



Page 14 



EDITOR James O'Connor 

MANAGING EDITOR Terry Welsh 

COPY EDITOR Regis Mallotj 

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Mike Klein 

BUSINESS MANAGER Tom Tracy 



1959 



GER 



)lorado - VOLUME 47 




Page 15 




REV. HAROLD L. STANSELL, S.J, M.A., Ph.D. 



Page 16 



dedication 

priest, historian, moulder of men 



The seats of higher learning throughout the world 
have traditionally been the institutions entrusted with 
the task of rounding out and advancing toward com- 
pletion the unfinished man. Colleges and universities 
are best equipped to work on and with the whole man, 
soul and body. Herein are taken the raw materials of 
the embryonic citizen, scholar, and worker to be 
fashioned into the mature individual ready to take his 
proper place in society and to assist that society in pro- 
gressing according to the dictates of right reason. Here- 
in can the body be trained to assist the healthy and 
vigorous man. Herein can the soul be directed to the 
proper and fruitful use of its faculties: right reason and 
judgment by the intellect and ethical action by the will. 

Fundamental to the success of any college or uni- 
versity in attaining its goal of providing society with 
well developed members is the quality of its faculty. An 
institution's degree of achievement stands or falls on 
the ability of its faculty members to train the unfinished 



man, to mould him to that degree of perfection toward 
which the institution reasonably strives. 

It is with pride in his remarkable abilities and a 
deep sense of gratitude for his availability that your edi- 
tor and staff submit this work to a man who exemplifies 
the best qualities of a good teacher, the Rev. Harold L. 
Stansell, S.J., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of His- 
tory, and head of the Department of Social Sciences. 
Father Stansell's knowledge of history, with particular 
emphasis on the French Revolution and the Protestant 
Revolt, is well known by any student who has been 
privileged to hear his lectures. His interest in and 
knowledge of current political problems is proverbial. 
Of greater importance to the student, however, is his 
uncanny ability to make all areas of history come alive, 
to impress themselves on the seeker's mind. To this 
priest, historian, moulder of men, we humbly dedicate 
this 1959 RANGER. 




Page 17 




snai 



1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 18 



F 
A 
C 
U 

L 
T 
Y 



Pa ire 19 



Back near the turn of the century, there was a sign on the outskirts 
of one Southern city which never failed to attract the attention of travelers. 
It was located beside what has since become a smooth highway but was then 
a winding dirt road connecting variot 

The sign read: CHOOSE^ iSE DU ', III 

FOR THE NEXT 20 YEARS. 




Now, by substituting .ike,, 
roadside sign might well serw as ai 
who are about to graduate. 

There have been many changes sine- 
velers more than half a cen 



it was in 1900. You are on 
Catholic college graduate, 
develop yourself into a thin 
Choose the habit 
During your pas 
ty and knowledge, and lear 



"rut," this 19th Century 
of advice for those of you 

tic sign cautioned tra- 
s as applicable today as 
mal education and, as a 

continue to improve and 

C 

^culate citizen. 
:h will lead you tojfese goals. 

ly0g.TsWLt Regis, yMJpiave acquired new maturi- 
;e lpK£tical ju^Bp.ents based on your ability 



to gather and assimilate faH s • Use! t 
and spiritual growth in you 

It is a power and 
will exercise. 

May God prosper you always. 




continue your intellectual 



, and which I know you 




Richard F. Ryan, S. J., 
President. 



Paw 20 




VERY REV. RICHARD F. RYAN, SJ. 

PRESIDENT 

REGIS COLLEGE 



Paw 21 




Very few positions can be found in the business world 
that demand the talents of an administrator, an educa- 
tor, and a disciplinarian. This is the position of the Dean 
of Studies in every Jesuit College; and at Regis, this po- 
sition is most capably filled by the REV. LOUIS G. 
MATTIONE, S.J. During his years as Dean, Fr. Mat- 
tione has been very active and moreover very successful 
in raising the academic level of the College. It has been 
mainly through his efforts that Regis has become able to 
compete academically with any other college of the 
nation. 





As Father Minister of the Jesuit community, the REV. 
ARTHUR O. VERDIECK, S.J., fulfills one of the most 
important jobs connected with the operation of the 
college and the high school. Fr. Verdieck received a 
Bachelor's and a Master's degree from St. Louis Uni- 
versity and now in his second year as minister is also 
chaplain at St. Vincent's Home. He is the former ath- 
letic director of Regis High School as well as past 
president of the Denver Parochial League. 



Dean of Men at Regis for seven years, the REV. FRAN- 
CIS J. MALACEK, S.J., is a member of the philosophy 
department and faculty representative to the Student 
Senate. Holding degrees in the classics, philosophy, and 
Sacred Theology from St. Louis University, Father 
taught at Rockhurst College in Kansas City and was 
connected with the Institute of Social Order there. Ac- 
tive in teacher training, Father Malacek is a member of 
several metropolitan councils for education and research 
in human relations. 



Assistant to the Dean, professor of business administra- 
tion, and head of that department, MR. JOHN V. 
COYNE holds an A.B. in economics from the University 
of Notre Dame and a Master's degree in business ad- 
ministration. Previous to coming to Denver 14 years 
ago, Mr. Coyne taught at Santa Maria Junior College, 
California, and in 1956 co-authored the book, Principles 
of Retailing. He is former director of the evening di- 
vision and a former athletic director. 



Pase 22 




Director of O'Connell Hall and superintendent of build- 
ings and grounds, the REV. WILLIAM H. STEINER, 
S.J., served his regency at Regis High School from 1946 
to 1949 and, immediately after ordination, was once 
again sent to Regis. Father holds a Rachelor's degree 
in the classics and a Master's in history, both from St. 
Louis University, and was minister of the community 
for three years before becoming superintendent three 
years ago. 





Chairman of the Department of Science and Mathe- 
matics, REV. FRED DALY, S.J., is one of the most 
active and personable faculty members on the Regis 
faculty roster. In the classroom his witty and eloquent 
lectures brighten and ease the study of mathematics. 
His tireless devotion as chairman of the Athletic Board 
has contributed considerably to the high caliber of 
RANGER basketball in recent years. Last year, Father 
Daly was also the guiding force in the building of 
Regis' two new buildings. 

As treasurer of Regis College, REV. WILLIAM F. 
HOUSER, S.J., holds a position envied by few of his 
associates. His duties demand that he be not only well 
versed in the intricacies of financial operations but also 
capable as an administrator. Every dollar connected 
with the operation and development of the college must 
pass through Fr. Houser's office. Fr. Houser must also 
determine the financial capabilities of students when he 
functions as a member on the committee on Student 
Aid and Scholarships. Presently Father is one of the 
Board of Trustees of the College. 



Since 1930, the Director of the resident students of the 
college has been the REV. BERNARD KARST, S.J., 
whose responsibilities were doubled in the past several 
years with the construction of O'Connell Hall. Fr. 
Karst holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in the classics 
and a M.A. in Latin from St. Louis University. During 
the fall and spring semesters, Father teaches Latin, and 
during the summer sessions, is an assistant professor 
of education. 





In the world of complex business it rests on the 
shoulders of such instructors as MR. PETER A. ROTAR, 
Assistant Professor in Rusiness Administration, and 
REV. EDWARD H. WINTERGALEN, S.J., Associate 
Professor of Economics, to develop the competent busi- 
nessmen needed. Mr. Rotar, a native of Yugoslavia, ac- 
quired his master's degree from the Harvard School 
of Rusiness and has previously taught at Creighton 
University and St. Thomas College. The Rev. Winter- 
galen, in addition to his demanding position as head of 
the Department of Economics, also very capably mod- 
erates the Regis RROWN & GOLD. Photography and 
outdoor sports are Father Wintergalen's other prime 
interests on which he spends any spare moments. 





An understanding of the mind and a means of convey- 
ing understanding are the respective goals of Assistant 
Professor of Psychology, MR. JOHN A. FLANAGAN 
and Instructor in Education MR. GLEN O. STOCKING. 
Mr. Flanagan besides his position as Head of the Psy- 
chology Department is very active in lecturing to vari- 
ous organizations and civic groups in the Denver area. 
He is also associated with the placement office and is a 
former athletic director. Mr. Stocking, the Director of 
the Department of Education, is another member of the 
Regis faculty well known regionally for his lectures. 
Refore coming to Regis, Mr. Stocking taught at the Uni- 
versity of Denver and the United States Navy School 
of Music. 



Assistant professors JAMES RELTON and DONALD 
KLENE have become well-established figures in the 
English department at Regis since their inauguration as 
faculty members. Among the students they have be- 
come quickly known for their thorough and energetic 
lecturing techniques in the classroom and for their con- 
geniality out of it. Refore coming to Regis, Mr. Relton's 
experience included the Carnegie Institute of Technolo- 
gy and St. Louis University. Mr. Klene served a gradu- 
ate fellowship at Notre Dame University where he 
attained his A.R. and M.A. in the field of English Litera- 
ture. Recently he has received his law degree from 
the University of Denver. 

One of the region's most renowned Jesuits, REV. DOC- 
TOR LUCUIS CERVANTES, S.J. is probably best 
known to the Regis students for his friendly smile. 
Resides his capacity as Professor of Sociology, he has 
achieved fame in the literary field with such well-known 
volumes as That You May Live and Marriage and the 
Family. As an outstanding spokesman, Fr. Cervantes 
has appeared on numerous radio and TV discussions. 
Finally as an authority on social problems, he is serving 
as the president of the Rocky Mountain Council on 
Family Relations. 



Page 24 





REV. GEORGE M. TIPTON, S.J., Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, first appeared on the Regis faculty in 1939 
when he taught at Regis High School. After receiving 
his Ph.D. in the field of chemistry from St. Louis Uni- 
versity, Fr. Tipton again returned to the Regis faculty 
where he has since served in the college chemistry de- 
partment. Fr. Tipton is well known to the freshman 
chemist for his seemingly insurmountable standards he 
demands and to the upper division chemists for the in- 
valuable foundation he has laid for their future. He also 
serves on the Commitee of Admission and Degrees. 




The words "stimulating," "dynamic," and "perceptive" 
characterize for many students, REV. ROBERT BOYLE, 
S.J., Asst. Professor of English and Head of the Regis 
English Department. He is one of Regis' most vivid 
educational personalities whose familiarity with litera- 
ture of all ages has popularized his classes. Fr. Boyle's 
favorite subject is the work of Hopkins, about whom he 
produced an often-quoted thesis while attaining his 
Ph.D. in literature at Yale University. 




The guiding light of the championship Regis debate 
team, the REV. CHARLES F. KRUGER, S.J., is an 
assistant professor of speech and sociology and the 
chairman of the library committee. Fr. Kruger holds 
a Bachelor's degree in library science and a Master's 
degree. Father's extensive work in public addresses and 
radio broadcasts well qualifies him to coach the debate 
team. Also intensely interested in the stock market, Fa- 
ther is frequently sought for his advice on stocks and 
bonds. 



REV. WALTER HARRIS, S.J., Instructor of Theology, 
is one of the best-known personalities on the campus. 
As director of Spiritual Activities he is always available 
to any student whether he be seeking advice or just con- 
versation. Fr. Harris' stimulating retreats have also 
been a source of his regional popularity. But his com- 
panionable attitude toward the students is perhaps the 
quality for which most alumni always remember Fr. 
Harris. 





Moderator of the RANGER, the college yearbook, the 
REV. RICHARD F. BOCKLAGE, S.J., is an instructor 
in lower division English at Regis. Having studied the 
works of the Catholic English poetess, essayist, and 
journalist, Alice Meynell, during graduate school, Fr. 
Bocklage holds an A.B. and a M.A. from Loyola Uni- 
versity in Chicago and is also a Bachelor of Sacred 
Theology from St. Louis University. Father taught at 
Creighton Prep, Omaha, before coming to Regis, and 
while at St. Mary's College, St. Mary's, Kansas, pub- 
lished several book reviews for the Catholic Review 
Service. 




One of the most outstanding examples of the dedica- 
tion of the Mathematics Department, providing the stu- 
dents with a firm foundation in the mathematical as- 
pects of their education, is the REV. THOMAS F. 
SINGLETON, SJ. As Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics, he is especially signalized by his quiet force- 
fulness and sparkling congeniality with the students. 
Apart from his teaching duties, Father Singleton is a 
member of the College Library Committee and numer- 
ous mathematical groups across the country. 








The REV. HARRY KLOCKER, S.J., has just been re- 
warded this past year with the title of Assistant Pro- 
fessor. As Head of the Department of Philosophy, he 
has given many popular lectures in his own unique 
style. These lectures and his thought provoking ideas 
given especially to sophomores in the Philosophy of 
Being class present him as one of the outstanding in- 
tellectuals present on campus. Father Klocker has the 
rare ability of communicating the most difficult aspects 
of philosophy without compromising them. He is quite 
vigorous in his duties as Moderator for the Sodality 
and the Aquinas Academy. 




Both in the department of commerce and finance at 
Regis, MR. MILES J. DOLAN and MR. FRED L. 
WIESNER are Certified Public Accountants in the 
state of Colorado. Mr. Dolan is an instructor in ac- 
counting and received a Bachelor of Science degree in 
accounting from the University of Denver. Mr. Wiesner, 
also a C.P.A. in Kansas, holds a B.S. from Creighton 
University, is head of the accounting department and a 
professor of economics. A member of the student life 
committee, he received an award at Creighton when he 
graduated from the commerce school there with the 
highest average in his class. 



As Physics, long the field of the specialist, comes more 
and more into the domain of liberally educated men, 
REV. JOSEPH V. DOWNEY, S.J., Professor of Phys- 
ics, and REV. ANTHONY J. ROCHEL, S.J., Instructor 
in Physics, have expanded the department to meet the 
present-day demands. Fr. Downey, who has received 
nation-wide recognition for the countless hours of study 
and work he has spent with the Seismic Observatory at 
Regis, has received his M.S. in Physics from St. Louis 
University. Fr. Rochel is especially noted for his un- 
usual knowledge of electronics and his experiments in 
this field. He has also received his M.S. in Physics from 
St. Louis University. 




One of the never to be forgotten aspects of education at 
Regis is that added task she undertakes of inculcating 
into secular education Christian principles. The care of 
this facet of Catholic education has been entrusted to 
REV. EDWARD MAGINNIS, S.J., newly appointed 
head of the Theology Department. Father Maginnis 
came to Regis from the Institut Catholique of Paris, 
France, where he studied for three years. Under his 
guidance the theology program has assumed a new 
concentration. 




Formerly a teacher at Regis High School, the REV. 
JOHN F. LYONS, S.J., joined the staff of the college 
in 1955 in the English department, and in the fall of 
1958 was promoted to associate professor of English 
literature. Father holds an A.R. from Regis and a 
M.A. in English from St. Louis University. His special 
interests are the drama and biographies, and his favorite 
periods of literature are the 18th and 19th centuries. 



Providing the classical foundation for a liberal educa- 
tion is the REV. MATTHEW R. LYNCH, S.J., In- 
structor in classical languages. He obtained his master's 
degree in classical languages from St. Louis University 
where he subsequently was engaged as a professor in 
the summer school. His teaching experience also in- 
cludes several years at both Marquette and St. Louis 
University High Schools. During this, his first year at 
Regis College, Father Lynch taught both Latin and 
Greek. 





Associate Professor of Philosophy, the REV. CHRIS- 
TIAN L. RONNET, S.J., has popularized his lectures 
with his unique style and thought provoking ideas. As 
exemplified by his P.H.L. degree acquired at Gregorian 
University of Rome, Father Bonnet's knowledge of 
philosophy is well capable of acquainting the student 
with the organization of mental life. Aside from his 
academic activities, Father Bonnet's favorite hobby is 
that of watches, and his aid is constantly being sought 
by the economy-minded student whose timepiece re- 
quires attention. 

Serving Regis as professor, doctor, pre-professional ad- 
visor, and admissions committeeman is REV. ELMER J. 
TRAME, S.J., Professor of Biology. As professor, Father 
Trame's lectures always carry an informal air but the 
student soon realizes that even his jokes are meaningful. 
Heading the Student Health department, Father Trame 
is always at hand for the ailing student besides his re- 
sponsibility for the health of the basketball team. To 
the pre-medical or pre-dental student, Father Trame is 
an inexhaustible source of information and advice. Yet 
even with this schedule, Father Trame still finds time 
to serve as week end chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital 
in Denver. 




The "Spiritual Father," BERNARD J. MURRAY, S.J., 
has resided on the college campus for 32 years. Granted 
an A.B. and a M.A. from St. Louis University, Fr. Mur- 
ray has taught at Loyola Academy, Chicago; Creighton 
Prep, Omaha; Regis High School, and Regis College, 
and has been principal of the high school and athletic di- 
rector of the college. During the war, Father was ci- 
vilian chaplain of the Army Student Training Corps 
and handled Regis' public relations for seven years. 






Holding an A.B. from Kansas State Teacher's College 
and a M.A. from the University of Colorado, MR. 
FRAN A. KIENE, Director of the Evening Division, is 
completing his first year at Regis. A member of Phi 
Delta Kappa, an honorary educational fraternity, and 
the Knights of Columbus, Mr. Kiene was a speech in- 
structor for five years in the high school of Garden 
City, Kansas, and for another five years taught history 
at Garden City Junior College. 




MR. MICHAEL E. ENDRES and MR. BERNARD W. 
SHEEHAN are just completing their first year at Regis. 
Holding a Bachelor's degree from Aquinas College in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, and a Master's in sociology 
from the University of Notre Dame, Mr. Endres' special 
interests are correctional administration and criminology. 
"The Great Awakening" is the favorite historical period 
for Mr. Sheehan whose teaching assignment at Regis 
is his first professional one since receiving his Master's 
degree in history from the University of Michigan in 
1958. 




Proprietor of the campus shop and college infirmarian 
is BROTHER JOHN J. RENK, S.J., a Jesuit for 27 
years. Interested in the study of butterflies for their 
delicate coloration, Brother Renk has won world-wide 
fame in this endeavor. He studied at the University of 
Wisconsin, St. Louis University, and the Alexian Brother 
School of Nursing, and is a registered Colorado phar- 
macist. Brother compiled the weather summary which 
is the basic work for the study of meteorology and in 
past days was the trainer for the Regis football team 
and ran a PX for the soldiers during the war. 




One of Regis' more famous alumni and more noted 
professors is the MOST REVEREND BERNARD 
SULLIVAN, Titular Bishop of Halicarnassus. As a stu- 
dent at Regis College he gained fame as an athlete 
and scholar. From the small campus he moved to 
India and became missionary, educator, and bishop. 
Since his retirement from his See in India Bishop Sul- 
livan has taught English and Theology. His geniality 
and engaging personality have made his classes ex- 
tremely popular. 



The administrative duties of MARTIN C. KELLY, As- 
sistant to the President, PAUL DOUGHERTY, Business 
Manager of Regis College, along with the affairs of 
public-relations handled by Publicity Director, DICK 
CONNERS, could be indexed in volume form. Mr. 
Kelly is invaluable to President Ryan not only as an 
advisor and consultant but also as his personal repre- 
sentative. Mr. Dougherty is responsible for the manag- 
ing of the extensive financial affairs concerned with the 
College, and Mr. Conners covers every phase of cam- 
pus life keeping it in the public light. 





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1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 30 



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Page 31 



alpha delta gamma 



sponsors ja£l concert for 
entire student body 




OFFICERS: Jim Creamer, vice-president; Terry Sheehy, president; 
Father Karst, S.J., Moderator; Ray Meyer, secretary; Terry Welsh, 
treasurer. 



The purpose of Alpha Delta Gamma, a national 
Catholic Social Fraternity and service organization, is 
to unite congenial minded men in a brotherhood of love 
and high respect; to develop the highest Christian ideals 
of manhood among its members; to foster the interest of 
every institution of learning with which it shall become 
affiliated; to promote scholarship among its members 
and their fellow students; and to establish and promote 
better alumni relationships. 

In its ninth year of existence on the Regis campus, 
Alpha Delta Gamma was named the "Outstanding Or- 
ganization on Campus" at the first annual awards 
banquet. 

Highlighting this year's activities was the annual 
Coronation Ball. The Alpha Delt's also presented the 
most successful Halloween Dance in the history of the 
chapter, and a jazz concert for the entire student body. 
Events for members only included pinning parties and 
chapter banquet. 

Their major service project was the solicitation of 
advertisements for the RANGER. 

Leading the spirited organization was Terry Sheehy, 
president; Jim Creamer, vice-president; Ray Meyer, sec- 
retary and Terry Welsh, treasurer. 



ALPHA DELTA GAMMA-Front Row: Mike Wanebo, Don Pacheco, Mike Klein, Jim Taylor. Back Row: Tom Schneider, Frank Maggio, Jim Obst, Keith 

Meisel, Jerry Haushalter, Jerry Morrison. 




Page 32 




ALPHA DELTA GAMMA— Front Row: Ken Karr, Emmett O'Brien, Bob Rehan, Andy Hudson, Pat O'Neill. Back Row: Terry Welsh, John Hartmeyer, Harold 
Marcotte, Charlie McCarthy, Larry Hawn, John McCoy. 



Keith Meisel and Mary Ann 
O'Boyle at a serious moment at 
their pinning party. 




Page 33 



alpha kappa psi 



educates public in regard to higher 
ideals in business world 



The largest professional business fraternity in the 
world, Alpha Kappa Psi is an organization which is 
dedicated to furthering not only the individual welfare 
of its members, but the prestige of the school as well. 

To be considered for membership, a student must 
be a major in Business, Accounting, or Economics and 
maintain an over-all average of at least 2.0. A pro- 
spective member must also desire to learn more con- 
cerning the world of business. 

Among the major activities of Alpha Kappa Psi this 
year were included professional talks, service projects 
and the sponsoring of the Presentation Ball. The group 
also conducted a speech program for members and 
had monthly communion breakfasts. 

Each year Alpha Kappa Psi presents a "Man of the 
Year" award to an alumnus in recognition of outstanding 
contributions to his profession. 

Leading the Gamma Sigma chapter of Alpha Kappa 
Psi was Larry Brady, who served as president, assisted 
by Joe Culig, vice-president, Lou Botter, secretary, and 
Jerry Shea, treasurer. Master of rituals was Tom De- 
Bochie. Faculty sponsor of the chapter was Mr. 
Budy Sporich. 

OFFICERS: Jerry Shea, treasurer; Joe Culig, vice-president; Larry 
Brady, president; Lou Rotter, secretary; Tom DeRochie, master of 
rituals. 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI— Front Row: John Trenkle, Steve Compton, Dan Smith, Tom Murphy, Larry Blackford, Larry Brady. Second Row: Jim Mahoney, Tom 
Griffin, Ken Joule, Jim Arvidson, Jerry Shea, Vic Perrella, Tom Pepin, Vince Mangus. Back Row: Bert Zumtobel, Bob Goetz, Joe Adducci, Bill Meirs, 
E. J. Martinez, George Beutner, Joe Culig, Bob Etzkorn. 





Pace 34 




ALPHA KAPPA PSI— Front Row: Lou Caricato, Mario Mapelli, Lou Doyle, John Kosednar, Tom Tracy, James Hofsetz. Second Row: John Owens, Jim Mc- 
Cormick, Tom DeRochie, Gene Mueller, Lou Rotter, Bill Whelan, Jerry Kilpatrick, Steve Humann, Jim Boatright. Back Row: Bob Dietz, Barry Dawson, Jim 
Clark, Tom Regan, Joe Markey, John Foley, Ken Blick, Mike Kailing, Walt Swirczynski. 






. 



AKPsi members take time out 
to pose for the RANGER pho- 
tographer during one of their 
weekly meetings. 




Pare 35 



rho chi sigma 



tour the leading industrial 
plants in denver area 




Chemistry majors and pre-medical and pre-dental 
students find intellectual advancement and comrade- 
ship as members of Rho Chi Sigma. The chemistry fra- 
ternity, founded in October, 1946 by Rev. T. Louis 
Keenoy, S.J., is affiliated with the American Chemical 
Society and offers to its members a source of further 
knowledge in their primary field of scholastic endeavor. 

At the bi-weekly meetings of PXE, visiting teachers 
and professional men deliver lectures on topics of cur- 
rent interest in the field of chemistry. Tours of such 
plants as Ohio Oil Co. and the Martin Co. add to the 
scholastic program of the fraternity. Cooperative efforts 
of the members leads to the solution of the problems of 
individual members of the fraternity. 

J 

Under the guidance of its moderator, Dr. Francis 
Ozog, the organization of twenty-one members is gov- 
erned by Pete Schwab, president, Bob Baumgartner, 
vice-president, and Tom Kukar, secretary-treasurer. 

Pledging for prospective new members is conducted 
in the fall of the year when third semester chemistry 
students may be admitted to membership. Climax of 
social activities is the annual spring banquet. 



OFFICERS: Tom Kukar, secretary-treasurer; Bob Baumgartner, vice- 
president; Pete Schaub, president. 



RHO CHI SIGMA— Front Row: Pat O'Meara, Bob Pipkin, Mark Reinecke. Second Row: Mathew Nickels, Steve Telatnik, Dave Eby, George Coughlin, 
Wayne Davis. Back Row: Bill Allen. Jim Weber, Ben Cosimi, Jim Max, Mike Donne, Mike Burke. Jim Gahl. Rav Reddick. Dennis Gillen, Dick Hilmer. 




Page 36 



sponsors seminars, discussions, 
lectures for members. 



literary club 



The Literary Club under the able leadership of its 
president Regis Malloy and its moderator Rev. Robert 
Boyle, S.J., has become one of the most respected and 
most active organizations on the campus. The club 
meets weekly to analyze methods of writers, to evaluate 
the merits of both classicists and contemporaries and to 
hear talks and papers on pertinent subjects. The group 
also sponsors lectures by outstanding authorities in vari- 
our fields of literature and has played host to renowned 
authors. 

The club has participated in numerous seminars, 
roundtable discussions and has often appeared on the 
weekly television show sponsored by Regis College. 

Members of the club have consistently done well in 
the Jesuit Educational Association essay contest. In this 
competition against top students from the many Jesuit 
universities, members have consistently placed in the 
top ten per cent. 

The Literary Club was founded on the ideal that 
good literature belongs to all and so the organization 
welcomes all interested students as well as majors in 
English literature. 




OFFICERS: Charlie Bastien, secretary; Rev. Robert R. Boyle, S.J., 
moderator; Regis Malloy, president. 



LITERARY CLUB— Left to Right: Tom Remington, Bill Marvel, Jim O'Connor, Regis Malloy, Rev. Robert R. Boyle, S.J., Charlie Bastien, Dave Sprehe, Bob Lalich. 

J? " - 




Page 37 



st. thomas more 



sponsors pre-legal lectures 
for student body 




The St. Thomas More Club, under the energetic 
leadership of Gene Cavaliere, is comprised of those men 
who plan to enter law school upon graduation. The pur- 
pose of this group is better to acquaint the members 
with the theory of the law, the theory of the state and 
to acquaint the members with the obligations which they 
will assume upon entering the profession. The group 
holds weekly discussion sessions in which they discuss 
some current book of political philosophy. 

The club also sponsors guest speakers who are 
prominent in the legal profession. These men are prac- 
ticing lawyers, leading jurists and deans of various law 
schools. These lectures are open to the entire student 
body. 

The St. Thomas More Club also obtains information 
for its members on the entrance requirements to law 
schools and helps its members to be accepted at some 
university. 

The club was under the co-moderatorship of Mr. 
Donald Klene and Rev. Harold Stansell, S.J. Mr. Klene 
is a graduate of the University of Denver Law School 
and is a member of the Colorado Bar Association. 



OFFICERS: Gene Cavaliere, president; Father Stansell, S.J., and Mr. 
Donald Klene, co-moderators. 



ST. THOMAS MORE-Front Row: Mr. Donald Klene, Fr. Stansell, S.J., Gene Cavaliere. Back Row: Tom Croak, Paul Horan, Bob Kelly, Ron Moshel, Tom 

Scaglia. 




Pace 38 



provides christmas music 
on campus radio 



glee club and choir 



Providing liturgical music at divine services and giv- 
ing to the melodically inclined student an opportunity 
to express his talents are the prime purposes of the 
Glee Club and Choir. Hampered by the lack of a 
formal school of music at Regis and by the lack of 
professional direction, the organization, nevertheless, 
has achieved sufficient musical poise to sing the various 
high masses celebrated on campus and to assist at 
forty hours, benediction, holy hours and other services 
as required. In addition, the choir this year inaugurated 
its first program of Christmas music broadcast over 
the campus radio station. Under the direction of Regis 
Malloy the choir sang the Mass of the Holy Ghost at 
the beginning of the fall semester and the Solemn High 
Mass of Requiem for the late Pope Pius XII as their 
major liturgical efforts. The very existence of the or- 
ganization, even as a choir, is primarily the result of 
the continuing work of the moderator, the Rev. Walter 
Harris, S.J., the president, Hemy Blum, and the director. 




OFFICERS: Henry Blum, president; Regis Malloy, director. 



GLEE CLUB AND CHOIR-Front Row: Frank Selak, Eduardo Padilla, John Pazereskis, Regis Malloy. Second Row: Gene Mueller, Grant Wade, Phil Beau- 
vais, Jim Schieferecke, Ken Babka. Back Row: Fred Cordova, John Denton, Fred Reichert, John Veatch, Dick Kelly, Jerry Cullen. 




Page 39 



■ 



denver club 



co-sponsors mixer-pep rally 
for basketball team 




The Denver Club, under the energetic leadership of 
George Coughlin, this year emerged as an outstanding 
organization on campus. Its principal aim is the uniting 
of the Denver students for stronger support of all 
school activities. 

The majority of the Denver Club's activities this 
year was with the Loretto Heights Denver Club as co- 
sponsor. Outstanding among these was the combination 
mixer-pep rally for both colleges in Machbeuf Hall at 
the beginning of the basketball season. Also highly suc- 
cessful for the second year was the Christmas carolling 
followed by a party for the Denver students during the 
vacation holidays. 

The major service activity of the Denver Club is as- 
sistance to incoming freshmen. This is an annual proj- 
ect of the Club and consists of meeting the freshmen 
at the train or at the airport, providing transportation to 
the campus and helping these new students in their ad- 
justing to college life. 

Assisting the president in organizing the club's ac- 
tivities were Dave Eby, vice-president, and Paul Horan, 
secretary-treasurer. 



OFFICERS: Bob Pipkin, secretary; Dave Eby, vice-president; George 
Coughlin, president. 



DENVER CLUB— Front Row: Bob Pipkin, Bob Connor, Bill Allen, Dan Hoskin. Second Row: George Coughlin, Paul Baker, Dave Eby, Pete McLaughlin, Bill 
Whelan. Back Row: Jim Kerr, Mark Reinecke, Tom Scaglia, Paul Horan, Rick Dutton. 




Page 40 




DENVER CLUB— Front Row: Alonzo Ruybal, Al Gishner, Nick Cinnoco, Ben Cosimi, Mario Mappelli. Back Row: Bill Marvel, Mike Dunn, Bob Baumgartner, 
Mark Kimmel, Tom Constantine. 



Denver club president George 
Coughlin accepts a motion from 
the floor in a lively Denver 
club meeting. 




Page 41 



r club 



recognises varsity lettermen for 
athletic achievement 




The R Club comprises men who have distinguished 
themselves through successful participation in some 
branch of intercollegiate athletics. These men have 
earned a major or a minor letter because of their 
achievement in their particular sport. They are the 
personification of the zeal and interest that have given 
to Regis a long tradition of physical strength. Clean 
sportsmanship in all phases of athletic life is the pledge 
of the members of this organization. 

The purpose of the club is to develop a greater 
student, faculty, and alumni interest in athletics at Regis; 
to work, in conjunction with the athletic department, 
to further athletics in general at Regis and to assist that 
department in any promotion that it may wish to under- 
take; to help foster a greater and more vigorous school 
spirit in athletic events; to promote the general welfare 
of the athletes; and to publicize athletic events. 

Responsible for guiding the R Club this year was 
Terry Sheehy, president. Bob Linnenberger acted as 
vice-president, while Jim Butler served as secretary and 
treasurer. 



OFFICERS— Jim Butler, secretary-treasurer; Terry Sheehy, president; 
Bob Linnenberger, vice-president. 



R CLUB-Front Row: Howard Marshall, John McCoy, Herb Millard, Ken Blick. Back Row: Jerry Smith, Bob Linnenberger, Terry Sheehy, Mike Christopher, 

Jim Butler. 




Paw 42 



promotes exciting slope sport 
during cold months 



ski club 



One of the most active groups on campus, the Ski 
Club has come to number virtually every skier or would- 
be skier at Regis. With its original objective of further- 
ing student interest in this seasonal sport, the club has 
been received with such enthusiasm in recent years 
that its seasonal aspect has become one of full-year 
active participation. Long before the slopes to the west 
of Regis are open for skiing the members are busily 
planning the activities of the coming year, and even with 
the closing of the slopes, the climax of the activities is 
still ahead with the annual banquet held at the mountain 
resort, The Isle of Pines. 

Naturally most of the club's activities concern ski- 
ing itself. These include club-sponsored excursions both 
for the members and often with members of other 
clubs, intramural races, and beginners' lessons. How- 
ever, as a result of injuries the active participation in 
these functions fluctuates sharply between the season's 
jubilant beginning to its much mourned end. 

The only requisites for membership in this energetic 
group are a small amount of courage and a large amount 
of determination. 




*r"^ ft \3ssi ! ; 



OFFICERS: John Pazereskis, Bill Freschi, Bob O'Donnell pose with Jim 
O'Connor, president; Chris O'Donnell, treasurer; and Mike Klein, 
secretary. 



SKI CLUB— Front Row: John Tarabino, Pat Klein, John McCoy, Mike McCue, Henry Walter, Mike Klein. Back Row: Pat Hughes, Jim O'Connor, Tom Connolly, 
Jim Obst, Joe Tarabino, Chris O'Donnell. 




Page 43 



sodality 



entertains local orphans at 
jestitive halloiveen party 




The idea of the Sodality is hundreds of years old 
and since its inception has grown to be an interna- 
tional organization with individual units in virtually 
every Catholic college in the country. The Regis So- 
dality has been in active existence since 1878. 

The primary aim of the Sodality is a fostering of 
a more than ordinary devotion to Our Blessed Lady in 
order that, helped by her special protection, its mem- 
bers may lead a pure Christian life, give aid to their 
neighbors, and defend the Church. Coupled with this 
aim the Sodality purposes to create a lay apostolate that 
will develop qualified leaders and assist the Church in 
its apostolic mission. In order to achieve this goal, the So- 
dality holds regular meetings, sponsors retreats, and 
encourages a greater participation in the Mass and the 
use of the rosary. 

One of the Regis Sodality's most successful programs 
is conducting catechism classes at the State Reforma- 
tory, a weekly activity of the group. In addition, the 
Regis Sodality sponsors an annual Halloween party for 
the children of the nearby orphanages. These secondary 
activities of the Sodality members are a means used in 
achieving the organization's primary end. 



OFFICERS: Don Dierks, executive chairman; Father Harry Klocker, S.J. 
moderator; Richard Kelly, prefect; Carlo Walker, vice-prefect. 



SODALITY— Front Row: Ted Barth, Bill Quinn, Pete O'Neal, Don Dillon, Ted Paulbeck. Second Row: Jack Schippers, Tom Stewart, Jerry Schopfer, Jim 
Arvidson, Bob Swanson, Mike Kailing. Back Row: Dick Kelly, Bill Cochran, Jim Yax, Bob Martin, Chris O'Donnell, Pat Hanafee. 




Page 44 




SODALITY— Front Row: Don Dierks, John O'Hara, John McMahan, Dick Kelly. Second Row: Lou Doyle, Gene Mueller, John O'Rourke, Len Dilisio, Dennis 
Gallagher. Back Row: Ray King, Steve Telatnik, Joe Hammond, Joe Sullivan, Vince Backlage. 



Sodality members at their 
annual picnic which is spon- 
sored by the men's sodality 
and the women's sodality of 
the night school. 




Page 45 



kreg radio 



improved campus radio station 
offers greater coverage 




OFFICERS: Tom Harmer, chief technical engineer; Tom Remington, 
program director; John Foley, station manager; Jim Godfrey, direc- 
tor of engineers; Bob Dietz, secretary; Tom Dean, director of publicity. 



The north end of DeSmet Hall is the home of the 
transmitters and the technical equipment of the campus 
radio station, KREG. From Sunday to Friday, KREG 
operates with the contributed time and talents of some 
thirty disc jockeys, news commentators, interviewers, an- 
nouncers and engineers. 

Established just two years ago, the Regis College 
radio station, under the direction of its faculty modera- 
tor, Mr. Donald Klene, daily brings to the on-campus 
students a varied musical fare and local, national and 
campus news. Featured interviews with faculty mem- 
bers and prominent students help publicize administra- 
tion policies and student activities. 

To a certain degree the activities of the campus 
radio station have been limited by the restrictions of 
the Federal Communication Commission which de- 
termine the coverage a station can have. Unfortunately 
the station cannot be heard by the majority of the day 
students and by the eager ears of the local women's 
colleges and nursing schools. 

This year the station brought many new features 
to the students of Regis College. Among the highlights 
were the lively interviews with Hollywood personality, 
Mitzi Gaynor, and with Denver social leader, Mrs. 
John J. Sullivan. 



KREG RADIO-Front Row: Tom Simons, Tom Remington, Tom Dean, Kevin CKeefe, Dan Otero. Second Row: Regis Malloy, Mike McGinnis, Jim Godfrey, 
Lou Doyle, John Foley, Bob Dietz. 




Page 46 




KREG RADIO— Front Row: Bob O'Donnell, Pat Hanafee, Dick Schaefer, Bob Vescovo, Ted Paulbeck, Grant Wade. Back Row: Mike Roblee, Ted Barth, Tom 
Stewart, Tom Croak, Pat Hughes, Tom Copps, Queniin Ertel. 



Publicity manager, Tom 
Dean, picks up an exclusive 
interview with cinema ac- 
tress, Mitzi Gaynor. 




Pare 47 



debate society 



debate team triumphs 
Jesuit meet at loyola 




Winners of second place honors in last year's Jesuit 
Centennial Celebration debate contest at Loyola Uni- 
versity, the Regis Debate Society moved forward to 
further triumphs this year. Paul Horan and John 
Bruggeman for the affirmative and Thomas Scaglia and 
Allen Gerstner for the negative carried Regis' colors to 
success against the Air Force Academy and Omaha 
University. Participants in the University of Colorado 
Invitational Meet included Dennis Gallagher, Paul 
Horan, and John Bruggeman competing in dramatic 
oratory. 

Over Thanksgiving the Horan- Bruggeman team re- 
turned to Loyola to defend the position won last year. 
This meet is a round robin among the top Jesuit col- 
leges in the country. 

Second semester meets included Colorado State 
University and Winfield College which is the regional 
qualifying meet for the college championship meet 
held in the spring at West Point. 

Under the tutelage of the Rev. C. F. Kruger, S.J., 
the Society has continued to bring to Regis regional 
and national acclaim. 



OFFICERS: Tom Scaglia, secretary; Rev. Charles F. Kruger, S.J., 
moderator; John Bruggeman, vice-president; Paul Horan, president. 



DEBATE SOCIETY— Front Row: John Veach, Al Gishner, Grant Wade, Tom Scaglia. Second Row: John Bruggeman, Tom Figurniak, Jim Bruce, Rev. Father 
Kruger, S.J. Bock Row: Mike Flaherty, Paul Horan, Sam Sciortino, Pete O'Neal. 




Page 48 



administer and correct frosh 
entrance examinations 



n e a 



The student N. E. A. was introduced to Regis Col- 
lege on May 11, 1956. The local club, the O. F. Gold- 
rick Chapter, is one of the many groups which constitute 
the college division of the National Education 
Association. 

The officers are Carl Cecchine, president; Emil 
Ziegler, vice-president; Peter Cocozzella, secretary; 
Ralph Spear, treasurer; and Mr. Glen O. Stocking, 
moderator. 

Principally by means of extracurricular activities, this 
organization on the Regis campus aims at furthering the 
interests of the students who plan to make teaching the ; r 
profession. 

The activities of the club include the administration 
and correction of the freshman placement examinations, 
helping the Education Department hold its periodical 
seminars, attending the C. E. A. conventions and spon- 
soring social activities for its members. Future activi- 
ties will include the founding and directing of high 
school organizations for future teachers and the estab- 
lishment of stronger foundations for the club so it will 
be better able to achieve its goals. 

Keeping abreast of the rising student enrollment at 
Regis the Student N.E.A. has proudly noted a mem- 
bership increase of 100% over the past year. 




OFFICERS: Mr. Stocking, moderator,- Miss Montoya, secretary; Pete 
Cocozzella, secretary; Carl Cecchine, president; Emil Ziegler, vice- 
president; Ralph Spear, treasurer. 



NEA— Front Row: Ralph Spear, Mr. Stocking, Miss Montoya, Ray Scheringer, Carl Cecchine, Pete Cocozzella, Dan Spensieri, Dan Marino. 
Ray Meyer, Keith Meisel, Clem Hackethal, Don Schmitz, Don Yacovetta, Ken Karr, Emil Ziegler, Joe Buhr. 



Back Row: 




Page 49 



st. John berchman 



provides acolytes for all 
masses on campus 




Of a certainty few material rewards are derived 
from rising at six a.m. to serve Mass in the four chapels 
on the Regis campus. Yet, this is precisely the major 
task of the St. John Berchman Society. The members 
serve as acolytes at the more than fifty Masses cele- 
brated each morning on campus, and it is inspiring to 
see the perseverance of the servers as they insure as- 
sistance to each priest saying Mass. 

Appreciation of the dedication of the society to serve 
mass can be readily seen in the large number of mem- 
bers it has to its credit. Each member considers serving 
Holy Mass not as a drudgery, but rather as a privilege 
and a blessing, for servers at Mass come closer to Christ 
in the Blessed Sacrament than other laymen are pri- 
vileged to do. 

Assigning hall captains to schedule the members as 
acolytes was Tom Croak, president of the Society. His 
officer assistants were Carlo Walker and Lou Doyle. 
The Rev. Walter Harris, S.J., spiritual director of the 
College, serves as moderator of the society. 



OFFICERS: Tom Croak, president; Carlo Walker, vice-president; Lou 
Doyle, secretary-treasurer; Rev. Walter Harris, S.J. 



ST. JOHN BERCHMAN'S SOCIETY-Front Row: Charles Budinger, Pete O'Neal, Jerry Cullen, Vince Bocklage, Jerry King. Back Row: Tom Croak, Carlo 
Walker, Lou Doyle, Bill Kiefer, Rev. Walter Harris, S.J. 




Page 50 




ST. JOHN BERCHMAN'S SOCIETY— Front Row: John McMahan, Bill Cochran, Tom Butler, Larry Taylor. Second Row: Frank Selak, Tom Linnebur, Ted 
Barth, John Mura. Back Row: Leo Huppert, Quinten Ertel, Ron Moschel. 



Bill Freski serves at Father 
Klocker's morning mass. 




Page 51 



playhouse 



presents rollicking comedy 
for autumn effort 




One of the marks of a college's cultural develop- 
ment is the vitality and versatility of its dramatic so- 
ciety. The Playhouse offers to those interested a 
chance to display their abilities and to acquire prac- 
tical experience in acting, writing and producing and 
in the many other varied aspects of the theater. 

Under the energetic direction of its moderator, Rev. 
A. J. Deeman, S.J., the Playhouse saw one of its best 
years as it staged two major productions in the mod- 
ern Bonfils Theater. 

The first of these was the Pulitzer Prize winning 
comedy "You Can't Take It With You." As the lights 
dimmed a hush penetrated the first-night audience and 
the curtain rose on the College theater production star- 
ring Dennis Gallagher and Mary Jo Catlett. From this 
success which was the most memorable in years the 
Playhouse began its series of short plays which have 
become so popular. 

Dennis Gallagher served as president as well as the 
most dependable and versatile actor. Dave Eby acted 
as business manager and assumed the responsibilities 
for the props, costumes, finances and many other duties 
which are necessary for a successful production. 



OFFICERS: Dennis Gallagher, president; Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J. 
moderator; Larry Clinton, secretary; Dave Eby, business manager. 



PLAYHOUSE-Front Row: Cornell Wamser, Arturo Leon, John Malensek, Jim Rauen, Larry Schmitt. Back Row: Pat Hughes, Ron Moschel, Ray Lamy, 
Mark Kimmel, Larry Clinton, Rev. A. J. Deeman, S.J. 




Page 52 




PLAYHOUSE— Front Row: Larry Schmitt, Fred Albi, Bob Laich, Val Grant. Back Row: Dennis Gallagher, Larry Hawn, Dave Eby, Mel Montoya, Jim Rhoads. 



Dennis Gallagher prepares 
for his role in "You Can't 
Take It With You." 




Page 53 



Italian club 



fosters spirit of 'old world' 
in regis members 




The Italian Club is a group of students who are 
for the most part of Italian descent and who are inter- 
ested in acquainting themselves and others in things 
Italian. Towards the accomplishment of this purpose 
the meetings of the Italian Club are given over in good 
part to a study of Italian language and the many liter- 
ary compositions that have become an important part 
of the literary heritage of the world. A large part of 
their endeavors are also directed toward preserving 
among themselves and popularizing among the student 
body the many fine old Italian customs now threatened 
with extinction. Many of the social functions of the 
Club have this same Italian flavor, spaghetti dinners and 
pizza pie. The fluctuating vitality of the Italian Club 
reached a new peak in being under the able direction 
of Mario Marpelli, the Club president, and his of- 
ficial assistants John Cambria, Jim Phillips, and George 
Falagrady. 



OFFICERS: John Cambria, secretary; Jim Phillips, vice-president; 
Mario Mapelli, president; George Falagrady, treasurer. 



ITALIAN CLUB— Front Row: Chuck Romano, George Falagrady, Mario Mapellio, Jimmy Phillips, John Cambria. Second Row: Dave Vitry, Pat Francalanica, 
John Mura, Bruce Tawson, Chuck Jenkins. Back Row: John Gallagher, Dan McNeil, Tom Scaglia, Dave Vostrejs, Gary Gallia, Al Zarlengo. 




Page 54 



interests members in a?icient 
and modern thought 



aquinas academy 



The Regis College Aquinas Academy has for its pur- 
pose the development of philosophical insight among 
its members through the consideration of significant 
problems in the field of philosophy, both ancient and 
contemporary. 

The ideas and conceptions of the late Emmanuel 
Kant were the subject for the discussions this school 
year. Meeting in the Regis High School library, the 
members of the Academy heard lectures, research pa- 
pers, and guest speakers on the prime subject. 

The organization is composed of Regis students who 
are majors in philosophy, or who are interested in the 
subject, which is required of all students of the college, 
and both professors and students from local colleges 
and universities. Moderated by the Rev. Harry Klocker, 
S.J., who holds a doctor's degree in philosophy from 
Gregorian University in Rome, the club had for presi- 
dent Gene Cavaliere and for vice-president Don 
Schmitz. 




OFFICERS: Don Schmitz, vice president; Father Harry Klocker, S.J. 
moderator; Gene Cavaliere, president. 



THE AQUAINAS ACADEMY is pictured in session during one of it many discussions of the philosophy of Kant. 




Page 55' 



booster club 



increased school spirit due to 



7\> 



new organization on campus 




OFFICERS: Dick Kelly, secretary; John O'Hara, vice-president; Pete 
O'Neal, president. 



A new and much welcomed club on the campus 
this year was the Regis Booster Club. With the ad- 
vent of this club, school spirit at Regis hit a new 
level. Organized late in November, the Booster Club 
set as its purpose the backing of all activities spon- 
sored by any Regis organization. The new club 
elected as its officers Pete O'Neal, president; John 
O'Hara, vice-president; and Dick Kelly, secretary. 

Its many activities during the year included the 
sponsoring of after-game dances during the winter, 
publicizing each game, and selling tickets for school 
activities. 

A great increase in organized cheering was noticed 
at basketball games this year. This was largely due to 
the efforts of the Booster Club to get the student body 
to cooperate with the cheerleaders. 

An important service of the Booster Club, one 
which practically everyone notices, is the supplying 
of cheerleaders for the basketball season. The six 
girl cheerleaders were from Loretto Heights. Back 
from last year were three sophomores, Sheila Ryan, 
Susan Leahy, and Mary Ann Di Janerio. Newcomers 
were freshmen Beverly Tryan, Julie Kelly, and Mary 
Laws. The six cheerleaders from Regis were seniors 
John O'Hara, Richard Kelly, and Tom Regan; junior 
Don Hall, who was given the job of "stunt" man; and 
freshmen Pete O'Neal and Andy Henske. The Co- 
captains for the 58-59 season were Sue Leahy and 
Dick Kelly. 




BOOSTERS CLUB-Front Row: Larry Nau, Tom Copps, Roger Mullaney, Greg Peters, Dick Pittlekow, Dana Rekate. Back Row: Ted Kern, Andy Henske, Vince 
Bocklage, Bill Cockran, Bill Gritten, William Graefe. 



Pace 56 




BOOSTER CLUB— Front Row: Pete O'Neal, Bernard Dingman, Raynond CKeefe, Dick Schaefer, Bob Vescovo. Back Row: Dennis M. McDaniel, Dan Eldredge, 
Bill Keefer, James McCarty, Dick Kelly, Pat Ryan. 



The action of the varsity 
basketball squad brings out 
many varied fans. 




Page 57 



brown and gold 



reporters search campus for 
current news scoop 




EDITORS: Ken Joule, sports editor; Mike Klein, photography editor; 
Jim Creamer, Dave Sprehe, co-editors. 



Students alone comprise the editorial, news, photo- 
graphic, and business staff of the BROWN & GOLD, 
the biweekly news organ of the student body of Regis 
College. Since its founding thirty-eight years ago, the 
Regis BROWN & GOLD has increased in physical size, 
circulation, and number of issues. At the present time, 
schedules call for eleven publications during the fall and 
spring semesters. 

The BROWN & GOLD offices in DeSmet Hall, 
serving as both editorial office and composing room, be- 
come the scene of great hubbub and seeming con- 
fusion every second Tuesday and Friday as articles are 
polished, columns edited and lay-outs completed in time 
to meet the deadline. 

Co-Editors-in-Chief for this year were Jim Creamer 
and Dave Sprehe. Ken Joule served as Sports Editor; 
Tom Remington, as News and Features Editor; Mike 
Klein, as photographer; and John Deasy, as Business 
and Advertising Manager. Under the direction of its 
moderator, the Rev. Edward Wintergalen, S.J., profes- 
sor of economics and a skilled photographer, the 
BROWN & GOLD strives to instill in its readers sound 
Catholic thought and in its staff members a knowledge 
of journalism and a sense of responsibility to the read- 
ing public. 



Staff members gather around as co-editors and moderator give out the next assignment. 




Page 58 




BROWN AND GOLD— Front Row: Lou Doyle, Jerry King, Fred Albi, Ron Moschel, Tom Constantine, John Lynch III. Second Row: Bob Harrington, Larry Tay- 
lor, Dick Kelly, Dan McNeill, Tom Simons, Bill Belford. Back Row: Jim Obst, Tony Cloutman, Jim Ryan, Tom Kukar, Larry Hawn, John McCoy, Joe Tarabino. 



BROWN AND GOLD co- 
editors consult with modera- 
tor, Fr. Wintergalen, as they 
check copy with other key 
staff members. 




Page 59 



the ranger 



named outstanding 
organisation on campus 




♦♦♦♦J 



OFFICERS: Rev. R. F. Bocklage, moderator, Jim O'Connor, editor- 
in-chief. 



With a returning force of veterans from last year's 
battle against deadlines, prefects and inertia, the 
RANGER staff faced this year's task with confidence 
and determination. Using the 1958 edition as a goal 
to strive for, Jim O'Connor, the editor-in-chief, mar- 
shalled his forces and plotted his strategy with an 
aim toward lessening the back-breaking and brain- 
busting strain of that enemy of all editors, the dead- 
line. 

Success in that never-ending war was practically 
achieved through such tricks as Chris O'Donnell's 
pressing into service unwary writers who wandered 
by the RANGER office, but the ubiquitous flu bug 
almost destroyed the best laid plans for, just a week 
before the final deadline, it put Jim O'Connor, Terry 
Welsh, and Mike Klein out of commission. Things 
looked less than rosy as the healthy board members, 
Ren Cosimi, Tom Tracy, Regis Malloy, and Chris 
O'Donnell, contemplated the job of finishing the book 
for the publishers. Rut, struggling out of their sick 
beds, the convalescents rejoined the healthy and, 
partly spurred by the RANGER'S being named the 
Outstanding Organization on campus, managed to 
wrap up the 1959 edition just in time to start cram- 
ming for quarter exams. 



EDITORIAL BOARD— Front Row: Mike Klein, photography editor; Ben Cosimi, sports editor; Regis Malloy, copy editor. Back Row: Jim O'Connor, editor- 
in-chief; Terry Welsh, managing editor; Chris O'Donnell, class editor; Tom Tracy, business manager. 




Page 60 




RANGER— Front Row: Jim Taylor, Dick Patton, Tom Harmer, Mike Roblee, Pete O'Neal. Back Row: Rev. R. F. Bocklage, Ray Meyer, Dave Rottino, Vince 
Bocklage, John CRourke. 



Members of the Ranger staff 
and their friends look at the 
trophies collected by them at 
the Awards Banquet. 




Page 61 




1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 62 



A 
W 

A 

R 




S 






Paw 63 



who's who 

selects 12 seniors to national honorary 



Vice-president of the Student Senate and director of 
the first Student-Faculty Conference, Gene Cavaliere 
has very successfully combined an excellent academic 
record with outstanding leadership at Regis. A re- 
cipient of an Outstanding Leadership award in his 
junior year and a frequent member of the Dean's 
List, Gene has served as president of the Aquinas 
Academy, the Vet's Club, and the St. Thomas More 
Club. A history major from Denver, Colorado, Gene 
is a pre-law student. 



IJim C< 



im { oieame>i 

Co-editor of the BROWN & GOLD during his senior 
year, Jim Creamer has combined leadership ability 
with academic prowess. A philosophy major from 
Denver, Colorado, Jim has attained recognition on the 
Dean's List while maintaining an active interest in 
extra-curricular activities. He has served as historian, 
steward, and vice-president of Alpha Delta Gamma, 
and as a representative of the day student conclave in 
the Student Senate. A pre-law student, Jim has also 
been a member of the St. Thomas More Club and the 
Denver Club. 









Mihe Wasieba 



od Pow&ib 



Vice-President of the Ski Club and steward of the 
Iota chapter of Alpha Delta Gamma, Mike Wanebo 
has consistently worked for a dynamic campus life at 
Regis. A pre-medical student from Denver, Colorado, 
with a divisional major in natural science, he has reg- 
ularly maintained a sufficiently high academic average 
to insure for himself a place on the Dean's List. Not 
content with the rigors of the pre-medical curriculum, 
Mike has successfully served as a member of the 
Aquinas Academy and the Biology Club. 



Secretary of the Student Senate during his senior 
year, Ed Powers has combined a sincere interest in the 
welfare of the Regis students with a willingness to work 
for projects that tend to advance that welfare. An 
economics major from Chicago, Illinois, and a member 
of the Ski Club, Ed has often been the unseen mover 
behind campus activities. A case in point is the mi- 
gration to Laramie for the Regis-University of Wyo- 
ming basketball game in December, which he organ- 
ized and saw through to a successful conclusion. 



Page 65 





UJUH— 



Qecfti, M allay 



Vic PeMeUa 



Treasurer of the Student Senate during his senior 
year, Regis Malloy has been a perennial member of the 
Dean's List. He has served as president of the Literary 
Club and of the local chapter of Circle K International, 
as director of the choir for three years, and as copy edi- 
tor of the RANGER. An English major from Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, Regis won the Mary A. Ryan 
Memorial Award as a freshman and an Outstanding 
Leadership award as a junior. He has also been a staff 
member of KREG and a member of the Vet's Club. 



Treasurer of his senior class, Vic Perrella has been 
very active in organizations dedicated to the advance- 
ment of the College. A business administration major 
from Denver, Colorado, he has combined scholastic 
achievement, to which the Dean's List has attested, 
with leadership qualities recognized by his election as 
representative of the day student conclave on the Stu- 
dent Senate. Vic has also been an active member of 
Alpha Kappa Psi, the Vet's Club, the National Educa- 
tion Association, and the Ralian Club. 



Page 66 





QkaUie Mc&cvitluj, 



f)i4n Qidl&i 



President of the Student Senate in his senior year 
and an officer of his class for three years, Charlie Mc- 
Carthy has contributed of his time and talents to many 
facets of Regis College life. An English major from 
Taos, New Mexico, Charlie has appeared often on the 
Dean's List, has served as treasurer of Alpha Delta 
Gamma, secretary-treasurer of the St. John Berch- 
man's Society, and has been a member of the Sodality 
and of the freshman basketball squad. In his junior 
year Charlie received an Outstanding Leadership 
award. 



A director of the Student Senate in his senior year, 
Jim Butler has exhibited remarkable prowess in the 
center spot on the varsity basketball team. In his junior 
year he received honorable mention on the Catholic 
All-America team. A business major from Chicago, 
Illinois, Jim has shown a spirited interest in Regis life 
through membership in Alpha Kappa Psi, the "R" 
Club, the National Education Association, the Chicago 
Club, and through his work as a staff member on 
the BROWN & GOLD. 



Pare 67 





7e^ Qkeeluf 



A director of the Student Senate during his senior 
year and an outstanding basketball player on the var- 
sity squad, Terry Sheehy has been recognized as an 
active campus leader since his freshman year. A 
mathematics major from Garden City, Kansas, he has 
held a class office for three years. Service as president 
of Alpha Delta Gamma and as president of the 
"R" Club marked him out to receive an Outstanding 
Leadership award during his junior year. Terry has 
also devoted much time to directing the intra-mural 
athletic program. 



7am Gioak 



President of the St. John Berchman's Society for two 
years, Tom Croak has demonstrated an exemplary 
willingness to give of himself for the progress of Regis. 
A history major from Colorado Springs, Colorado, he 
served on the Student Senate as O'Conncll Hall rep- 
resentative during his senior year. A combination of 
academic astuteness and energetic organizational abili- 
ty has placed Tom on the Dean's List while serving as 
president of the debate squad and as a member of the 
Literary Club, the St. Thomas More Club, and KREG. 



Page 68 





^om jbean 



lan/uf, Qtuady 



A director of the Student Senate during his senior 
year, Tom Dean has lent his jovial support to many as- 
pects of Regis College activity. A philosophy major 
from St. Louis, Missouri, Tom has appeared on the 
Dean's List. For his unstinting work as class officer, 
publicity director for KREG, columnist for the 
RROWN & GOLD, and art editor for the RANGER, 
he was awarded an Outstanding Leadership award in 
his junior year. He has also been a member of the 
Aquinas Academy and the St. John Berchman's Society. 



President of Alpha Kappa Psi during his senior 
year, Larry Brady has devoted much of his talent and 
energy to the betterment of Regis College. As a mem- 
ber of the Sodality, he directed the first annual awards 
banquet during his junior year. A business major from 
Thornton, Colorado, Larry was elected secretary of his 
senior class. He has likewise held office in the Vet's 
Club and has served on the Student Council. Recogni- 
tion of his leadership abilities was accorded him in the 
form of an Outstanding Leadership award. 



Page 69 




Left to Right: Larry Brady, Bob Bergkamp, Jim O'Connor, Blair Farrell, Terry Welsh. 

outstanding leadership 







Left to Right: Dick Kelly, Mike Klein, Don Dierks. 



outstanding service 



Pace 70 






WILLIAM C. KIEFER 
Senior 



BENEDICT A. COSIMI 
Junior 



scholastic achievement 



ROBERT D. PIPKIN 
Sophomore 



THOMAS C. WALSH 

Freshman 





Page 71 





Business major LOU DOYLE has shown 
his activeness as secretary of the sodality, 
reporter for the BROWN and GOLD, 
member of Alpha Kappa Psi and broad- 
caster for KREG. 



Amiable RAY MEYER, a senior from St. 
Louis found employment as advertising 
manager of the annual, student NEA, and 
secretary of Alpha Delta Gamma. 



Senior class vice-president DON DIERKS, 
working with characteristic thoroughness, 
was chairman of the Awards Banquet, of- 
ficer in the sodality, and member of the 
St. John Berchman Society. 



the ranger calls 



Politician BLAIR FARRELL roused 
masses as Junior Class president and stu- 
dent senate representative. This junior 
held a job in publicity office and still had 
time for KREG. 



Honors student DAVE SPREHE utilized 
academic effort and activity efficiency as 
BROWN and GOLD co-editor and as 
willing copy editor for the RANGER. 



Energetic CHRIS O'DONNELL con- 
tributed much time as Sophomore class 
vice-president, class editor of the 
RANGER, secretary of the Ski Club and 
as an Alpha Kappa Psi active. 




Page 72 





Busy senior BOB BERGKAMP headed 
many campus projects as senior class 
president and member of St. John Berch- 
man's Society and Sodality. 




Organizational ability and sincerity have 
characterized sophomore TOM TRACY's 
accomplishments as business manager of 
the yearbook and as an officer of his fra- 
ternity, Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Capable Alpha Delta Gamma MIKE 
KLEIN earned recognition as photogra- 
phy editor for the RANGER and BROWN 
and GOLD and as vice-president of the 
Junior Class. 



to your attention 



As president of KREG, Alpha Kappa Psi 
JOHN FOLEY has devoted many hours 
in the improving of the station's manage- 
ment and efficiency. 



Personable BEN COSIMI has achieved an 
enviable position both scholastically and 
activity-wise at Regis. Membership on 
the RANGER and Rho Chi Sigma head 
his extra-curricular activity list. 



Junior TERRY WELSH's driving ef- 
ficiency served him well as treasurer of the 
Junior Class, vice-president of his frater- 
nity, Alpha Delta Gamma, and as man- 
aging editor of the RANGER. 





gleason 

memorial 

award 



ROBERT LINNENBERGER, one of Colorado's 
top basketball players, is this year's recipient of the 
JOHN GLEASON MEMORIAL AWARD. Awarded 
each year by the brothers of Alpha Delta Gamma in 
recognition of prowess in athletics and scholarship, 
the award is dedicated to the memory of the late John 
Gleason, Regis basketball player killed in an automo- 
bile accident during his student days. 

Joining the Rangers after a short tenure at Okla- 
homa University, Bob earned the title of one of the 
highest field goal percentage men in the country. Al- 
though a defensive standout, he managed to maintain 
a 62.4 percentage by patrolling the back-boards like 
a leech. Always there with that all-important follow- 
up when a teammate's shot was off center, Bob also 
let loose from far out with marksman-like accuracy. 
The backboard bomber ended a remarkable career on 
the courts as captain of the Ranger quintet and by 
receiving the "outstanding team leadership" award at 
the Awards Banquet. The six-foot, four inch senior 
acted as floor general and all around sparkplug, firing 
the team with his seemingly boundless energy and 
enthusiasm. 

Bob's outstanding display of team leadership and 
good sportsmanship justify his receiving the JOHN 
GLEASON MEMORIAL AWARD for 1958-1959. 



robert I. Itnnenberger 



Page 74 




Page 75 




brown 
and 
gold 

award 



Instituted in 1951 under the auspices of the Rev. 
Louis G. Mattione, S. J., Dean of Students at Regis 
College, the BROWN & GOLD AWARD is presented 
this year to Jim O'Connor. 

The BROWN & GOLD AWARD is perhaps the 
highest praise that a student of Regis College can re- 
ceive. Although the idea of this award was not con- 
ceived by the editorial board or the staff members 
of the BROWN & GOLD, Dean Mattione requested 
that it be presented under this name. 

The editors and staff members of the college news- 
paper, having carefully considered each member of 
the senior class, chose one who portrayed a cross- 
section of this class. 

JIM O'CONNOR was selected to receive the co- 
veted golden plaque this year of 1959 because of his 
tireless efforts devoted to the successful production 
of the RANGER, the Regis College yearbook. Jim 
rightfully takes his place amongst the select num- 
ber of previous illustrious recipients of the award, 
among whom are Andy Martelon '51, Jim Drinkard 
'57, and Bill Bollwerk '58. He adds his lustre to this 
choice group of former students, students who have 
literally "lived" Regis College. 

Honorable mention is given by Dean Mattione 
and the staff of the BROWN & GOLD to two other 
seniors who have contributed much of themselves to 
the betterment of the college. 

Charlie McCarthy exemplified in his senior year 
all the sterling qualities that a successful student 
leader must have. As President of the Student Senate, 
he successfully guided the members of the Executive 
Board and of the Senate to one of the most profitable 
years of the group's history. 

Regis Malloy, in his capacity as Treasurer of the 
Student Senate, financially led the student governing 
body down a most prosperous path, while maintain- 
ing an almost perfect grade point average in his major 
field of English. 

As the inscription on the BROWN & GOLD 
AWARD plaque reads, these men are honored here 
"for outstanding contributions toward the progress of 
Regis College." 



Pajre 76 





regis p. m alloy 




charlie j. mc earthy 




Page 77 




9HS 






■ 



HK 



1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 78 



c 

L 
A 

S 

s 

E 

S 




Page 79 




EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS-Left to Right: Tom Dean, director; Charlie McCarthy; Terry Sheehy, director; Jim Butler, di- 
rector; Ed Powers, secretary; Regis Malloy, treasurer; Gene Cavaliere, vice-president. 



executive board 



Page 80 




Quiet efficiency characterized senior 
GENE CAVALIERE as he fulfilled his 
office of vice-president by directing 
Regis's first Student Faculty Conference. 




Setting the pace for the rest of the Board, 
secretaiy ED POWERS kept himself con- 
stantly busy in attending to the affairs of the 
student body. 



With the deftness of an accomplished 
accountant, senior REGIS MALLOY 
handled the Senate's financial respon- 
sibilities in a manner unparalleled in 
the history of the Senate. 



Leading the Student Senate to its greatest year 
in the histoiy of Regis, Senior CHARLIE MC- 
CARTHY displayed his effective abilities as Presi- 
dent of the Executive Board. 




: ll 



Varsity Basketball star, JIM BUTLER ful- 
filled his duties as Director by organizing the 
Freshmen Picnic and hike and by revising 
the Senate filing system. 



Campus wit TOM DEAN served as Senior 
Director this year. He also compiled this 
year's "R Book" and kept the Student 
Activities Calender- up to date. 



Busy senior and Varsity eager, 
TERRY SHEEHY handled his assign- 
ment as Director of Intramural Sports 
with efficiency, and thereby pre- 
served an old Regis pastime. 






-s^^SUP^^^^^"' 




seniors 



class of 1959 



Senior Officers: Treasurer, Victor Perrella; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Donald Dierks; President, Robert Bergkamp; Sec- 
retary, Lawrence Brady, Student Senate Alternate, John 
Shea. 






ST 

l 


i 


*- 


-t 




t 


b*> 





Pace 82 



Joseph Adducci 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 
Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Club. 



Italian 



James R. Babka 
Valley Park, Mo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Band; Glee Club; 
The Brown And Gold; Span- 
ish Club. 




James P. Butler 
Chicago, III. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Who's Who; Student Senate 
Director; Varsity Basketball 
Alpha Kappa Psi; R Club 
The Brown And Gold; NEA 
Chicago Club. 



Leigh W. Callender 
Sterling, Colo. 

B.S., Business 




Robert G. Bergkamp 
Garden City, Kan. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Varsity Baseball; R Club; St. 
John Berchman Society; Out- 
standing Leadership Award. 



V A jA 



Henry C. Blum 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Sodality; Glee 

Club, President. 




Philip F. Boberschmitt 
Madison, Wis. 

B.S., English 
Dean's List; 
Team. 



R Club; Golf 




Lawrence E. Brady 
Thornton, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Who's Who; Student Senate 
Representative; Sodality; Al- 
pha Kappa Psi, President; Vet 
Club, Vice-President; Class 
Officer; Outstanding Leader- 
ship. 





John M. Cambria 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Band; The Brown And Gold; 
Italian Club. 




Eugene C. Cavaliere 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Who's Who; Stu- 
dent Senate, Vice-President 
and Representative; Aquinas 
Academy, President; Italian 
Club; Vet Club, President; 
St. Thomas More— Pre Law 
Club, President; Outstanding 
Leadership Award. 



Carl L. Cecchine 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; NEA, President. 



Leo A. Chiolero 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 



William J. Clark 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 
Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; Sportsman's Club; De- 
bate Society; Denver Club; 
Vet Club, Vice-President. 






Vincent P. Cerrone 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Italian Club, 

President; Varsity Baseball; 

R Club; NEA. 



Earle M. Cline 
St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Mathematics 

St. John Berchman Society; 

Missouri Club, Secretary. 



Peter Cocozzella 
Denver, Colo. 

B.A., English 
NEA; Italian Club. 





William A. Crespin 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 




James J. Cramer 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Biology Club, 

Vice-President. 



James W. Creamer 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Dean's List; Who's Who; 
Student Senate Representa- 
tive; Alpha Delta Gamma, 
Vice-President; The Brown 
And Gold, Editor; Denver 
Club; St. Thomas More Club. 



Thomas E. Croak 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Who's Who; Stu- 
dent Senate Representative; 
St. John Berchman Society, 
President; Literary Club; De- 
bate Society, President; St. 
Thomas More Club. 






Joseph G. Cullen 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

B.S., Philosophy 

Sodality; St. John Berchman 

Society; Glee Club. 



Joseph W. Culig 
Pueblo, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Richard T. Cummings 
Glendale, Mo. 

B.S., Economics 

St. John Berchman Society. 



Thomas K. Dean 
St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Dean's List; Who's Who; Stu- 
dent Senate, Executive Board; 
St. John Berchman Society; 
KREG Radio Station; The 
Broivn And Gold; The Rang- 
er; Aquinas Academy; Out- 
standing Leadership Award. 



Page 85 



Frank J. Degenhart 
At wood, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Future Teachers of America. 



Thomas DeRochie 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi, Master Of 
Rituals; Sportsman's Club; 
Circle K International, Treas- 
urer. 



Francis M. Dierks 
Hot Springs, Ark. 

B.S., Mathematics 
Sodality, Secretary; St. John 
Berchman Society; Vice-Presi- 
dent Junior and Senior Class; 
Outstanding Service Award. 



Leonard DiLisio 
Raton, N.M. 

B.S., Mathematics 

Dean's List; Sodality; Glee 

Club; Aquinas Academy. 





Paul E. Doyle 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha K a p p a Psi; Denver 
Club. 



Edward E. Elliott 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 
Denver Club. 



Kenneth J. Espinoza 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Freshman Basketball; Sodali- 
ty; Spanish Club, President. 




Robert V. Eldredge 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Denver Club; Sodality; 

Thomas More Club. 



St. 




Charles J. Fuermann 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 
Sodality; Denver Club. 



Robert J. Goetz 
Englewood, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappa Psi. 




James F. Hofsetz 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 

Psi, Chaplain. 



Steve B. Humann 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 




Donald J. Fisher, Jr. 
Denver, Colo. 



B.S., History 
Dean's List; 
Vet Club. 



Denver Club; 



Thomas M. Griffin 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List; Sodality; Alpha 
Kappa Psi, Chaplain; St. John 
Berchman Society; Student 
Senate Representative. 




Clement Hackethal 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 
Italian Club. 



Kenneth Karr 
Chicago, 111. 

B.S., Sociology 

Alpha Delta Gamma; 

Ranger; Sociology Club. 



The 





James D. Keenan 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Biology 
Biology Club. 



William C. Kiefer 
Grand Junction, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 



Gerald Kilpatrick 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 




Richard Kelly 
Durango, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Dean's List; Sodality, Vice- 
Prefect, Prefect; St. John 
Berchman Society; Future 
Teachers Of America; Out- 
standing Service Award. 



Michael Kennedy 
Richmond Heights, 



Mo. 



B.S, History 

Freshman Basketball; Alpha 

Delta Gamma; R Club; St. 

John Berchman Society; Golf 

Team. 




RWKPilii 





John K. Landaker 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 
Italian Club. 



Steve W. Kovacik 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Literary Club; Denver Club; 
Dean's List; St. Thomas More 
Club; Glee Club. 



Robert D. Lalich 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Denver Club; Literary Club; 

Dean's List; Playhouse. 




John F. Lindeman 
University City, Mo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Dean's List; St. John Berch- 
man Society; The Brown And 
Gold; Aquinas Academy; Bi- 
ology Club. 



Kenneth W. Lane 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 
Sportsman's Club. 



Gerald A. Lawless 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 
Vet Club; NEA. 



Robert Linnenberger 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Varsity Basketball; R 

Vice-President; NEA. 




Charles J. McCarthy 

Taos, N.M. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Who's Who; 
President, Student Senate; 
Freshman Basketball; Sodali- 
ty; Alpha Delta Gamma, 
Treasurer; St. John Berchman 
Society, Sec.-Treas.; Student 
Senate Representative, Fresh- 
man Class; Sec-Treasurer, 
Sophomore Class; President, 
Junior Class. 



Regis P. Malloy 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Who's Who; Stu- 
dent Senate, Treasurer; Glee 
Club, Director; KREG; The 
Ranger; Circle K, President; 
Literary Club, President; Vet 
Club; Outstanding Leader- 
ship Award. 




Vincent A. Mangus 
Louisville, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 
Dean's List; Freshman Bas- 
ketball; Varsity Baseball; Al- 
pha Kappa Psi, Treasurer; R 
Club; Italian Club. 



Howard E. Marshall 
Napa, Calif. 

B.S., History 

Varsity Basketball; Varsity 

Baseball; R Club; NEA. 



Page 89 



Eleuterio J. Martinez 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; St. John 
Berchman Society. 



Manuel A. Martinez 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

B.S., Business Administration 
New Mexico Club. 



William H. Meiers 
Arkansas City, Kan. 

B.S., Business Administration 



Robert J. Miller 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 






David R. Moffitt 
Derby, Colo. 

Divisional Major 

Denver Club; Drama Club. 



James J. Molchan 
Peoria, III. 

B.S., Chemistry 
Dean's List; Sophomore Class, 
Vice-President; Junior Class, 
President; Rho Chi Sigma, 
Sec-Treasurer; Ski Club; St. 
John Berchman Society; Bi- 
ology Club. 



Patrick G. Moran 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Biology 

Dean's List; Biology Club. 



George G. Mossbrucher 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi, Secretary; 

The Brown And Gold. 




Charles A. Mulqueen 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 



Thomas A. Murphy 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; St. John Berchman 
Society. 



John A. Mullane 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Biology 
Dean's List. 




\ .* 




James E. O'Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

Freshman Basketball; Student 
Senate Representative; Sid 
Club, President; The Ranger, 
Editor; Denver Club; St. 
Thomas More Club; Literary 
Club; Outstanding Leader- 
ship Award. 



John M. O'Hara 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Sodality. 



Matthew L. Nickels 
Aurora, III. 

B.S., Biology 

Biology Club; Rho Chi Sigma. 




Emmett O'Brien 
St. Louis, Mo. 

B.S., History 

Alpha Delta Gamma. 





John R. O'Rourke 
Tuba, Okla. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Sodality; The Brown And 
Gold; The Ranger. 








John E. Owens 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Sportsman's 

Club. 




*P 






Victor A. Perrella 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Dean's List; Student Senate 
Representative; Alpha Kappa 
Psi; NEA; Italian Club; 
Senior Class Treasurer; Vet 
Club. 



Gerald R. Paxton 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 
Denver Club; Vet Club. 



Bernard E. Peters 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 



Ray C. Reddick 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Rho Chi Sigma; Biologv 

Club; Denver Club. 



Edward J. Powers 
Riverside, III. 

B.S., Economics 
Who's Who; Secretary 
dent Senate; Ski Club. 



Stu 




Thomas H. Pepin 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 




Charles A. Ramsey 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Vet Club. 




Tom J. Regan 
Garden City, Kan. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Freshman 
Basketball Manager; Cheer- 
leader. 



Robert G. Rehan 
Sioux City, Iowa 

B.S., History 

Alpha Delta Gamma. 



Thomas C. Rooney 
Aurora, Colo. 

B.S., History 

NEA. 



James A. Ryan 
Chicago, 111. 

B.S., History 

Sodality; Ski Club; St. John 
Berchman Society; The 
Brown And Gold; NEA. 




Lawrence F. Scheetz 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Mathematics 
Dean's List; Ski Club; Aquin- 
as Academy. 



Donald L. Schmitz 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Dean's List; Sodality; Aquin- 
as Academy, Secretary; Treas- 
urer of Freshman and Sopho- 
more Classes; Denver Club; 
NEA. 



Ray F. Schneringer 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Education 
Freshman Basketball; Varsity 
Baseball; R Club; National 
Education Association; Italian 
Club; Biology Club. 



Donald L. Schmitz 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Denver Club. 



Page 93 







R£.T* 



Peter A. Schwab 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Chemistry 

Dean's List; Rho Chi Sigma, 

President. 



John G. Shea 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Accounting 

Alpha Kappa Psi, Treasurer; 

Senior Class, Treasurer; Vet 

Club. 



Terrence C. Sheehy 
Garden City, Kan. 

Who's Who; Varsity Basket- 
ball; Alpha Delta Gamma, 
President; Student Senate, 
Director; Class Officer, Treas- 
urer Freshman Class, Presi- 
dent Sophomore Class, Vice- 
President Junior Class; R 
Club, Vice-President; Out- 
standing Leadership Award. 



. . . "Life is hard; be steel; be a rock." 
And this might stand him for the storms 
and serve him for humdrum and monotony 
and guide him amid sudden betrayals 
and tighten him for slack moments. 
"Life is a soft loam; be gentle; go easy." 
And this too might serve him. 
Brutes have been gentled where lashes failed. 
The growth of a frail flower in a path up 
has sometimes shattered and split a rock. 
Although will counts, so does desire. 
So does a rich soft wanting. 
Without rich wanting nothing arrives. 
Tell him too much money has killed men 
and left them dead years before burial: 
the quest of lucre beyond a few easy needs 
has twisted good enough men 
sometimes into dry thwarted worms. 
Tell him time as a stuff can be wasted. 




John M. Tarabino 
Trinidad, Colo. 

B.S., Economics 

St. John Berchman Club. 



Joseph H. Sullivan 
Douglas, Wyo. 

B.S., Sociology 

Sodality; St. John Berchman 

Society. 



Roger L. Sweeney 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Philosophy 
Dean's List; National Educa- 
tion Association; Aquinas 
Academy. 



Tell him to be a fool every so often 
and to have no shame over having been a fool 
yet learning something out of every folly 
hoping to repeat none of the cheap follies 
thus arriving at intimate understanding 
of a world numbering many fools. 
Tell him to be alone often and get at himself 
and above all tell himself no lies about himself 
whatever the lies and protective fronts 
he may use amongst other people. 
Tell him solitude is creative if he is strong 
and the final decisions are made in silent rooms. 
Tell him to be different from other people 
if it comes natural and easy being different. 
Let him seek deep for where he is born natural. 
Then he may understand Shakespeare 
and the Wright brothers, Pasteur, Pavlov, 
Michael Faraday and free imaginations 
bringing changes into a world resenting change. 

He will be lonely enough 

to have time for the work 

he knows as his own. 

Carl Sandburg 



Walter R. Valdez 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., History 

National Education Associa 

tion. 



Carlo J. Walker 
Huntsville, Alabama 

B.S., English 

Dean's List; Sodality, Vice 

President; St. John Berch 

man Society, Vice-President 

KREG Radio; Junior Class 

Secretary. 




Michael K. Wanebo 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Divisional Major 
Dean's List; Who's Who; Al- 
pha Delta Gamma, Steward; 
Ski Club, Vice-President; 
Aquinas Academy; Biology 
Club; Ski Team. 



Michael K. Wilson 
Salina, Kan. 

B.S., Sociology 

Ski Club; Sociology Club. 




Donald F. Yacovetta 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Sociology 

Sociology Club, Denver Club 



Bert F. Zumtobel 
Denver, Colo. 

B.S., Business Administration 
Alpha Kappa Psi, Veterans 
Club. 



Page 95 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS-Left to Right: Tom Kukar, secretary; Barry 
Dawson, Student Senate alternate; Blair Farrell, president; Terry 
Welsh, treasurer; Mike Klein, vice-president. 



junior s 



Page 96 




James F. Boatright 
Denver, Colo. 



Kenneth W. Blick 
Roggen, Colo. 




Joseph Abramo 
Montrose, Colo. 

George T. Allen 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

James E. Arvidson 
Keokuk, lotva 



John N. Baily 
Denver, Colo. 

Paul C. Baker 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert B. Baumgartner 
Denver, Colo. 



There's probably one in that building. 



Page 97 



class 




William Brady 
Denver, Colo. 



Michael F. Burke 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



^ 


B S 




I J 






A Cool Yul 



Louis A. Cariccrto 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Ronald A. Carlson 
Wheat Ridge, Colo. 

Carmen N. Cinocco 
Denver, Colo. 



Anthony J. Cloutman 
Salem, Mass. 

Thomas C. Connolly 
Sioux City, Iowa 

Donald E. Cordova 
Trinidad, Colo. 



Page 98 




/ 





w 



/ 




Your Grandmother died: again? 




MMimm 




John F. Deasy 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Terrance D. Dooher 
Denver, Colo. 



Benedict A. Cosimi 
Denver, Colo. 

George F. Coughlin 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald Cowan 
Denver, Colo. 




Thomas R. Cullan 
Hemingford, Neb. 

Wayne Davis 
Wheat Ridge, Colo. 

Barry T. Dawson 
Denver, Colo. 



Egad. It's a raid! 



Pace 99 



class 




This is radio's Wally Ballew at the Third Annual Lawn-Mower Races 



David H. Eby 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard C. Eyre 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael J. Fagan 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Blair K. Farrell 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

John Fehringer 
Peetz, Colo. 

AlE.Frei 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 100 




jjf ■; : v. 


PpH|SC * -^ 






1 


1 if 




'TTT'l^r 




v_=^^ 




1 





1P/^P^ 


1 


P^P^3^^H 










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HP^ , 






r? j 








HP 










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HE 






II :^5 






k a 



By the way, what did you say your name was, Honey? 





James F. Gahl 
West Allis, Wis. 

Dennis G. Gillen 
Greeley, Colo. 

Wm. C. Gregory 
Denver, Colo. 



James B. Guyer 
Fort Collins, Colo. 

Donald Hall 
Rawlins, Wyo. 

Robert J. Harrington 
Holyoke, Mass. 



John W. Hartmeyer 
Muncie, Ind. 



Lawrence E. Hawn 
Denver, Colo. 




Well, I think she looks indecent. 



Page 101 



class 



of 



1960 





Now you don't think I'd lie to ycni about my age, do you? 



Daniel Jiron 
Denver, Colo. 


John Kirby 
Denver, Colo. 


James H. Kearney 
Monmouth, 111. 


Andrew M. Klein 
Lenexa, Kan. 


Richard E. Kelly 
Omaha, Neb. 


Thomas J. Kukar 
Chicago, III. 



Page 102 





Lt. Gallagher breakes up Maffia meeting! 




Leon Guerrero 
Agana, Guam 

Thomas J. Luepke 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Dennis M. McDaniel 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Frank P. Maggio 
Rockford, III. 

Bill G. Mangus 
Louisville, Colo. 

Mario J. Mapelli 
Denver, Colo. 



Where in Hell did he go this time? 



Page 103 



class 



of 



1960 






Keith J. Meisel 
Rockfalls, III. 



Ray F. Meyer 
Ferguson, Mo, 




How long do I have to pose with these two idiots? 



Gene L. Mueller 
New Baden, III. 

Raymond T. Nalty 
Denver, Colo. 

James Obst 
Dallas, Texas 



James F. O'Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard J. O'Grady 
Lincoln, Neb. 

James R. Phillips 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 10 1 




Frank R. Quintero 
Denver, Colo. 

William W. Roach 
Denver, Colo. 

John A. Robinson 
Denver, Colo. 



David A. Rottino 
Bronx, N.Y. 

James P. Ryan 
Denver, Colo. 

John T. Schippers 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



They Aren't Kidding 



Page 105 



class 



of 



1960 





- i 




David L. Sprehe 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



James B. Stein 
Minneapolis, Kan. 




Man, I'm Nothin' But Sick! 




Robert L. Stein 
Denver, Colo. 

Walt Swirczynski 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Robert E. Tafoya 
Trinidad, Colo. 




Stephen C. Telatnik 
Avon Lake, Ohio 

Jerome R. Walrond 
Clayton, Mo. 

Terrence Welsh 
Great Bend, Kan. 



Page 106 




James M. Wetzel 
St. Louis, Mo. 

William J. Whelan 
Denver, Colo. 

James A. Wilkinson 
Lincoln Ridge, Ky. 



Ramond F. Wilkinson 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Michael R. Williams 
Denver, Colo. 

Mario H. Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 



You Sure As Hell Did! 



Page 107 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS-Left to Right: Paul Horan, treasurer; 
Chris O'Donnell, vice-president; Kenneth Joule, president; Peter Mc- 
Laughlin, secretary; Dennis Gallagher, Student Senate alternate. 



sophomores 



Page 108 




William M. Allen 
Denver, Colo. 

Rafael Almada 
Navohoa, Mexico 

Theodore Barth 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Morris G. Beddoes 
Waterloo, Iowa 

William A. Belford 
Beggs, Okla. 

Lawrence C. Blackford 
Denver, Colo. 




now I lay me down . . 




Frank Blatter 
Denver, Colo. 



George R. Boersig 
Lakewood, Colo. 




Cut one more "Z" in my under-wear, and I'll 



Page 109 



class 



of 



1960 









II 



r 










Maurice J. Boersig 
Ladeicoocl, Colo. 

Michael R. Boian 
Denver, Colo. 



James L. Brisnehan 
Denver. Colo. 

James Cabela 
Chappell, Neb. 



Thomas G. Carbone 
Deliver, Colo. 

Jim J. Carney 
Aurora, Colo. 

Nicholas L. Cinocco 
Denver, Colo. 



John J. Civerolo 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

James T. Clark 
Wichita, Kan. 

Edward L. Clinton 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 110 




Robert J. Connelly 
Denver, Colo. 

Tom E. Curran 
York, Neb. 

Larry J. DelMargo 
Trinidad, Colo. 



David D. Dick 
Wayzota, Minn. 

Robert R. Dietz 
Wauwotosa, Wis. 

Donald F. Dillon 
Alliance, Neb. 



Ronald A. Distel 
Silverton, Colo. 

Gerrett M. Doherty 
Chicago, III. 



Paul V. Dugan 
Wichita, Kan. 

Michael E. Dunn 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 111 



das 



s 



of 



1961 




■ -m§w*s*^ 




^C^Vf 1 


w 






■HP 1 


ji 


f ■ ::: 1- 





Anthony M. Dursey 
Denver, Colo. 

Gerald D. Espinoza 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Robert L. Fischer 
Denver, Colo. 

John B. Foley 
Wichita, Kan. 



Clem M. Frank 
Sterling, Colo. 

Dennis J. Gallagher 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard J. Gappa 
Winona, Minn. 



John C. Geary 
Leadville, Colo. 

James P. Godfrey 
Tuba, Okla. 

James C. Gottschalk 
Garden City, Kan. 



Page 112 





Notice how my blood flows down my sleeve. 




l §k <? 






*B§|lJigii^^^ ^i 




pW 1 






V 








1^^ 


7 1 


\ 


; r 


^ 




I ' 


i 




Delbert L. Groene 
Donnellson, Iowa 

Joseph Hammond 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick Hanafee 
Champaign, III. 



Thomas H. Harmer 
Rickford, III. 

Richard B. Heil 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Craig Hebbison 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas F. Hitzelberger 
Chicago, III. 

Paul Horan 
Denver, Colo. 



Harry W. Humphreys 
Denver, Colo. 

Clyde D. Johnson 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Page 113 



class 




Wilber E. Jordan 
Akron, Ohio 

Michael A. Railing 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Dennis M. Kennedy 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Joseph Dereszt 
Denver, Colo. 



Raymond King 
Laramie, Wyo. 

Michael T. Koning 
Denver, Colo. 

John H. Kosednar 
West Allis, Wis. 



Louis J. Kosednar 
West Allis, Wis. 

Patrick W. Kosmicki 
Alliance, Neb. 

David N. Kummet 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 114 





Swing it, gal! 








Thomas Landauer 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert A. Lennon 
Sioax City, Iowa 

Thomas A. Linnebur 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Henry C. Lopez 
Denver, Colo. 

Peter Loskouski 
Lawrence, Mass. 

George Luchetta 
Denver, Colo. 



Joseph M. Lyons 
Omaha, Neb. 

John L. McCoy 
Bayside, Wis. 



Michael W. McGlone 
New York City, N.Y. 

Peter McLaughlin 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 115 



class 




Maurice Mahli 
Boulder, Colo. 

Jim L. Mahony 
Denver, Colo. 



Lawrence W. Marrin 
Denver, Colo. 

Gerald W. May 
Cohvich, Kan. 



Michael F. Mayer 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Thomas D. Michelli 
Walsenburg, Colo. 

Herb C. Millard 
Rock Island, III. 



George S. Miller 
Palisades Park, N.J. 

Thomas F. Morgan 
Denver, Colo. 

Edwin J. Morrison 
Hartland, Wis. 



Page 116 







How's your ol' filter? 




lit! 

■ill 



Christopher J. O'Donnell 
Detroit, Mich. 

Owen P. O'Meara 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick H. O'Neill 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Dan L. Otero 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

Donald N. Pacheco 
Denver, Colo. 

Ted M. Paulbeck 
Elm Grove, Wis. 



Bruce W. Piper 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert D. Pipkin 
Denver, Colo. 



Charles R. Pittelkow 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Edward J. Proctor 
Cleveland Hts., Ohio 



Page 117 



clas 



s 



of 



1961 









William J. Quinn 
Cheyenne, Wijo. 

James L. Rauen 
Kenosha, Wis. 



Frank V. Reichwein 
North Hollywood, Calif. 

Mark E. Reinecke 
Aurora, Colo. 



Thomas J. Remington 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Gregory P. Rice 
Denver, Colo. 

Virgil L. Richmond 
Denver, Colo. 



Michael J. Roblee 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Derrick C. Rohlfing 
Grand Junction, Colo. 

Charles J. Romano 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 118 






It only hurts when I laugh. 








Charles J. Romero 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph G. Ryan 
Denver, Colo. 

Ernie Salaz 
San Pablo, Colo. 



Peter M. Sargent 
Alamosa, Colo. 

John P. Sauer 
Steamboat Springs, Colo. 

Thomas N. Scaglia 
Denver, Colo. 



Thomas F. Schneider 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

John L. Schulte 
Casper, Wyo. 



Edward A. Schwartz 
Denver, Colo. 

Ralph A. Schwartz 
Hartington, Neb. 



Page 119 



class 




Dennis J. Seitz 
Salt Lake City, Utah 

Ronald L. Skoglund 
Denver, Colo. 



Dennis E. Starbuck 
Brighton, Colo. 

Stewart N. Summers 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert J. Swanson 
La Grange, III. 

Robert P. Swift 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph A. Tarbino 
Trinidad, Colo. 



James B. Taylor 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Frank J. Tobin 
Mitchell, S. Dak. 

David J. Toepfer 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 120 





I'm Johnny, The New Boy 






Thomas J. Tracy 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 

John A. Trenkle 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert E. Vescova 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Joseph H. Ware 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael V. Wells 
Los Alamos, N.M. 

Lawrence E. Welte 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Richard D. Weskamp 
Arvada, Colo. 

A. Kenton Williams 
Charleston, W. Va. 



James F. Yax 
Lincoln, Neb. 

Albert E. Zarlengo 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 121 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS-Left to Right: Vol Grant, Student Senate 
alternate; Fred Albi, secretary; Vince Bocklage, president; Bill Freschi, 
vice-president; Dan McNeill, treasurer. 



freshmen 



Page 122 




Tom J. Able 
Durango, Colo. 

Xavier Aguilar 
Guadalajara, Mexico 

Fred A. Albi 
Denver, Colo. 



Donald D. Alders 
Denver, Colo. 

Henry B. Alire 
Denver, Colo. 

Peter G. Allen 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Jesse B. Avila 
Denver, Colo. 

David C. Bailey 
Denver, Colo. 



Homer D. Baker 
Littleton, Colo. 

Michael B. Bamrick 
Scottsbluff, Neb. 



Page 123 



class 



of 



1962 





Michael H. Barbich 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard M. Bash 
Tuba, Okla. 



Tom H. Batt 
Denver, Colo. 

Philip J. Beauvais 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Dennis D. Bellairs 
Julesburg, Colo. 

Robert E. Bellefeuille 
Denver, Colo. 

John W. Berg 
Bridgeport, Neb. 



Daniel J. Beshoar 
Denver, Colo. 

Michael Betka 
Denver, Colo. 

Ferman F. Bischofberger 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 124 





You're Not Exactly What I Had Expected 







Michael D. Bisenius 
Denver, Colo. 

John M. Blayney 
Glendale, Mo. 

Vincent P. Bocklage 
Normandy, Mo. 



Joseph Bonsignore 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Warren W. Bostwick 
Denver, Colo. 

Herbert Brentlinger 
Cheyenne Wells, Colo. 



Charles F. Brown 
Chicago, III. 

James F. Bruce 
Last Chance, Colo. 



William P. Buckley 
Midland, Texas 

Charles J. Budinger 
Winnetka, 111. 



Page 125 



class 



of 



1962 






Joseph D. Buhr 
Raton, N.M. 

Thomas W. Butler 
Cripple Creek, Colo. 




Mark J. Cheresposy 
Laguna, N.M. 

John S. Chojanacki 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Robert S. Christensen 
Denver, Colo. 

William J. Cochran 
St. Louis, Mo. 

John A. Collins 
Chicago, III. 




Robert Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph M. Connor 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas Constantine 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 126 





Blackboard Jungle 






>V 




Robert W. Cook 
Rifle, Colo. 


Fred D. Cordova 
Pueblo, Colo. 


Roy A. Dougherty 
Denver, Colo. 


Peter R. DeHaas 
Broomfield, Colo. 


Tom R. Copps 
Stevens Point, Wis. 


Patrick L. Cronin 
Denver, Colo. 


Ronald J. Davlin 
Denver, Colo. 


John M. DeLaney 
Denver, Colo. 


Michael J. Corbin 
Alton, III. 


David J. Cullan 
Hemingford, Neb. 







Page 127 



class 



of 



1962 






Gary P. DeMarlie 
Moline, III. 

John R. Denton 
Meade, Kan. 



it'--'- 











Jm *&: jggk 


o* 


■***% Wm 




/JM 







George Diaz 
Denver, Colo. 

Bernard J. Dingman 
Houghton, Iowa 




Patrick F. Dowd 
Grand Island, Neb. 

James C. Downes 
Winnetka, III. 

Tom F. Downing 
Denver, Colo. 



Donald L. Dunn 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard M. Dutton 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert F. Eaton 
Wheat Ridge, Colo. 



Pace 128 




Daniel J. Eldredge 
Hudson, Wis. 

Joseph A. Eldredge 
Denver, Colo. 

Del J. Ellis 

Wheat Ridge, Colo. 



Quentin G. Ertel 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Weld H. Fickel 
Denver, Colo. 

Walter Figurniak 
Denver, Colo. 



Michael F. Flaherty 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

William S. Fletcher 
Hominy, Okla. 



William J. Freschie 
St. Louis, Mo. 

John R. Gallagher 
Westminster, Colo. 



Page 129 



class 



of 



1962 





-"•Km 






5fc*if$& 




Charles J. Galli 
St. Louis, Mo. 


William G. Carson 
Denver, Colo. 


Allen Gerstner 
Denver, Colo. 


William S. Graefe 
Des Moines, Iowa 


Thomas F. Galligan 
Denver, Colo. 


John P. Geerdes 
Hoxie, Kan. 


Richard K. Getter 
Arvada, Colo. 


Corbert V. Grant 
Denver, Colo. 






Robert B. Glivar 
Denver, Colo. 


Carl M. Graves 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 130 




George W. Green 
Denver, Colo. 

William E. Greitan 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

John M. Hamaker 
Rockford, III. 



John J. Hamerli 
Topeka, Kan. 

James E. Hartmann 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Hasenkamp, John G. 
Denver, Colo. 



Charles G. Hauser 
Denver, Colo. 

Ed Leo Heeren 
Denver, Colo. 



Andrew A. Henske 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Donald J. Hirsch 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 131 



class 



of 



1962 





i 





Richard L. Hoogerwerf 
Moline, III. 

Ted W. Horren 
Denver, Colo. 



Daniel T. Hoskins 
Denver, Colo. 

Patrick L. Hughes 
Kansas City, Mo. 



Leo W. Huppert 
Okmulgee, Okla. 

Joseph J. Immordino 
Lakeland, Colo. 

Benny P. James 
Sioux City, Iowa 



James N. Jarboi 

Monrovia Liberia, W. Africa 

Charles L. Jenkins 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas E. Jensen 
Kansas City, Mo. 



Page 132 






Don't you wish, wise guy! 








Harold W. Johnson 
Denver, Colo. 

James K. Jones 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

John K. Kealey 
Davenport, Iowa 



David J. Kelly 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Robert A. Kelly 
Boonston, N.J. 

Terrance E. Kelly 
Leadville, Colo. 



William H. Kelly 
Wilmette, III. 

Douglas H. Kent 
Scottsbluff, Neb. 



James J. Kerr 
Denver, Colo. 

Mark Kimmel 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 133 



class 



o 



1 



1962 





James C. King 
Des Moines, Iowa 

Thomas P. Klein 
Lenexa, Kan. 



Geza E. Kmetty 
Denver, Colo. 

John C. Koester 
Denver, Colo. 



Duane A. Krier 
Akron, Colo. 

Max S. Kudar 
Jackson, Wyo. 

Harry Kynette 
Dallas, Texas 



Robert I. Lammerman 
Denver, Colo. 

Raymond P. Lamy 
Winnetka, III. 

Arthur G. Larkin 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 134 




4$ 40 fH&W \ 


w 


ys ] 




if- -^m 




1*4/ 






I got them for Christmas. 



Richard A. Lay 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Michael J. Learned 
Denver, Colo. 

Joseph J. Lederhos 
Denver, Colo. 



Arturo Leon 
Chuquicamata, Chile 

James D. Lindeman 
Universih/ City, Mo. 

Richard A. Lohman 
St. Louis, Mo. 



John P. Lynch 
Creve Coeur, Mo. 

James B. McCarty 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Clell L. McClung 
Walnut, Kan. 

Terence J. McCormick 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 135 



clas 



s 




William B. McCurdy 
Pewaukee, Wis. 

Dennis M. McDaniel 
Canon City, Colo. 



James M. McGinnis 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 

John C. McMahan 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



Daniel M. McNeil 
Huntington Sta., N.Y. 

Mike J. McNeive 
Great Bend, Kan. 

David P. McNelis 
Phoenix, Ariz. 



Edward J. MacBlano 
Johnson City, N.Y. 

Neil M. MacDonald 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Francis J. Maginn 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Page 136 






OH, OH, Dirty Joke Time! 




John R. Malensek 
Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Paul A. Maley 
Alton, III. 

William A. Maltby 
Denver, Colo. 



Randy A. Marcantonio 
Denver, Colo. 

Feliciano Marin 
Denver, Colo. 

Robert M. Martin 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Gerald E. Meismer 
Paxton, Neb. 

Dennis P. Melvyn 
Amarillo, Texas 



John T. Metz 
Denver, Colo. 

Roger P. Milbert 
Dyersville, Iowa 



Page 137 



class 



of 



1962 









John P. Murphy 
Denver, Colo. 

Anthony B. Montez 
Denver, Colo. 



Patrick Moore 
Denver, Colo. 

John D. Moran 
Lamar, Colo. 



Richard V. Moreno 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald W. Moschel 
Cheyenne, Wtjo. 

James C. Muckenthaler 
Denver, Colo. 



Roger P. Mullaney 
Winnetka, 111. 

John A. Mura 
Kansas City, Mo. 

John F. Nash 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Page 138 




Lawrence J. Nau 
Munster, Ind. 

Colin T. Normington 
Superior, Wyo. 

Rodney L. Nusse 
Lakewood, Colo. 



Stephen W. O'Brien 
Enid, Okla. 

Roland P. Ochs 
Denver, Colo. 

Richard O'Connell 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert E. O'Donnell 
Albany, N.Y. 

Joseph R. O'Hayre 
Denver, Colo. 



Kevin R. O'Keefe 
Chicago, III. 

Bernard T. O'Leary 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 139 




Pete J. O'Neal 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Richard H. Ostberg 
Englewood, Colo. 



Eduardo C. Padilla 
Brush, Colo. 

Leon F. Patterson 
Morrison, Colo. 



Richard A. Patton 
Arlington Heights, III. 

James R. Paxton 
Denver, Colo. 

John F. Pazereskis 
Waukegan, III. 



Lee B. Peligreen 
University City, Mo. 

Michael K. Perry 
Detroit, Mich. 

Greg A. Peters 
Greendale, Wis. 



Page 140 







John H. Peto 
Englewood, Colo. 

Robert J. Pfeffle 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Richard T. Pittelkow 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Douglass Primavera 
Arvada, Colo. 

Michael H. Quinn 
Denver, Colo. 

Gilbert E. Rael 
Brigton, Colo. 



Douglas H. Raymond 
Evergreen, Colo. 

Frederick A. Reed 
Los Alamos, N.M. 



Fredric C. Reich 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Fred F. Reichert 
Selden, Kan. 



Page 141 



class 



o 



</ 



1962 











/ 




George E. Reid 
Denver, Colo. 

lames T. Rhoades 
Denver, Colo. 



Robert J. Roth 
Goodland, Kan. 

Isidro C. Rubi 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



Nelson J. Ruddy 
Denver, Colo. 

Donald L. Ryan 
Albuquerque, N.M. 

Patrick M. Ryan 
Neenah, Wis. 



Thomas P. Ryan 
Denver, Colo. 

Bert J. Sardello 
Trinidad, Colo. 

Richard R. Schaefer 
Waswatosa, Wis. 



Page 142 




of 


' iP iSP -ftilr 


# 

40 1 ^1 


^ ~**wBlJm 



Gregory P. Scheetz 
Denver, Colo. 

George Schenfeld 
Brigton, Colo. 

James A. Schieferecke 
Dresden, Kan. 



Charles L. Schmitt 
Denver, Colo. 

Henry W. Schmitt 
Si. Louis, Mo. 

William C. Schooler 
Denver, Colo. 



Ron C. Schreiber 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sam C. Sciortino 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Albert E. Seep 
Denver, Colo. 

Franklin J. Selak 
Pueblo, Colo. 



Page 143 



class 




Robert G. Sellers 
Denver, Colo. 

Jerome F. Sherman 
Hastings, Neb. 



James J. Sievers 
Englewood, Colo. 

Thomas F. Simons 
Caracas, Venezuela 



Robert E. Sims 
Denver, Colo. 

George A. Smith 
Dallas, Texas 

Jerry L. Smith 
Charleston, W. Va. 



Robert N. Smith 
Denver, Colo. 

Joe E. Stancato 
Salida, Colo. 

Clifford V. Stanley 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 144 




John M. Stark 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Larry C. Strub 
Denver, Colo. 

Thomas J. Sullivan 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Peter H. Swanson 
Denver, Colo. 

Gerald P. Sweetman 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

John Swirczynski 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Clifford Synoground 
Richland, Wash. 

Jerry Szalay 
Los Alamos, N.M. 



Jose M. Tafoya 
Denver, Colo. 

Paul M. Tartaglia 
Albuquerque, N.M. 



Page 145 



das 



s 



o 



1 



1962 







*w J 






Hi 


■■'•-" i v* 


•g 




''■''Mi 




m 










Larry K. Taylor 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Jerry Tellez 
Greeley, Colo. 



Stephen J. Terrien 
Elm Grove, Wis. 

Gerald B. Theisen 
Denver, Colo. 



John D. Thorsen 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

Jerry E. Tong 
Carlsbad, N.M. 

James P. Turner 
Munster, Ind. 



George H. Twining 
Denver, Colo. 

John L. Vecrtch 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Larry B. Vifguain 
Denver, Colo. 



Page 146 






Some Day The World Will Hear Our Voices 




Leopold J. Vigil 
Denver, Colo. 

Dave L. Vitry 
Denver, Colo. 

David L. Vostrejs 
Denver, Colo. 



Charles G. Wade 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Richard D. Wallner 
Wanwatosa, Wis. 

Thomas C. Walsh 
Kirkwood, Mo. 



Cornell J. Wamser 
Denver, Colo. 

Hugo P. Weber 
Denver, Colo. 



William J. Wethington 
Denver, Colo. 

Kennith V. Williams 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 



Page 147 




1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 148 



A 

G 
T 
I 
V 
I 
T 
I 
E 
S 




Page 149 



freshman initiation 

freshman initiation week begins 
academic year for students. 



The freshman week program at Regis College 
was designed for the purpose of orienting the new 
freshmen to the various phases of College life. It 
offers these newcomers to the college atmosphere the 
perspective around which their future lives will re- 
volve and initiates the friendships and associations 
which are so much a part of a good college life. 
Consequently, the events encompassed both social 
and academic activities, giving the new students a 
sampling of what was to come and how to adjust to 
their new environment. Placement test, conferences 
with advisors, orientation meetings directed by upper- 
classmen all were directed toward enlightening the 
new students' views of their school and its customs. 

The real purpose of the hazing which dominates 
these hectic first days of Freshman life is not, as some 
may think, to humiliate the new students, but rather 
to acquaint them in the quickest possible way with 
campus life. The psychology behind the practice 
seems to be that a student, who is forced to undergo 
some mildly rigorous exercises at the hands of the 
upperclassmen, will enter into closer contact with these 
upperclassmen than would be possible through the 
normal, more civilized channels. Whether or not this 
theory works out in practice, the fact remains that 
the traditional Freshman Week is a lot of fun for 
the sophomores, who, we must not forget, were last 
year's freshmen. 



Students and their dates take time out to relax during hectic 
week. 




km olP f 




Gathering in library, freshmen hear upperclass leaders explain 
student activities. 




Page 150 




Eager freshmen begin one of their long walks during 
freshman week. 




The hula hoop craze is enjoyed by a student and his 
newly-found friends. 



A wild water fight begins as the authority of the upper- 
classmen begins to disappear. 



Page 151 





The new frosh's induction into Regis life is characterized 
by the donning of the traditional green beanies, memorizing 
of the names of the "Powers-that-be" in the Administration 
and Student Senate, and the observance of the ability to 
address politely any upperclassmen whose path should un- 
fortunately be crossed. Failure to comply with such tradition 
leads to the notorious Kangaroo Court. 

The highlight of the two weeks of hazing was the annual 
hike to Loretto Heights whose twelve mile course provided 
many a misery for the frosh and a fine morning of relaxation 
and refreshment for the sophomore trail drivers. Armed with 
shaving cream, strong voices, ropes, and liquid reinforce- 
ments, the sophs were well prepared to handle any stam- 
pedes as the drive started. As the morning wore on, however, 
the restlessness of the frosh and the intervention into their 
physical torment by city officials somewhat dis-organized the 
sophs' herding tactics so that the last freshmen to reach the 
promised goal were nearly an hour behind the first. The 
welcome sight of food and refreshments served by gentle 
hands quickly revitalized the entire group. 

Although the anticipated mud fight between the fresh- 
men and upperclassmen on the last day of hazing was not 
held due to the weather this year, the traditional all-events 
field day was again a tremendous success with the freshmen 
winning as usual. As a result, the hazing ended with the 
annual Freshman Frolic that night with the announcement 
of the Freshman Queen. 

Certainly, hazing here at Regis taxes the ingenuity 
of the sophomores, the patience of the freshmen, and the 
enthusiasm of all. 




At the start of the hike, some of the Frosh were 
heartened by the thought of the cooling plunge 
which awaited them at the Heights. 



Freshman week swimming parties were en- 
joyed by all who found out that a cooling dip 
was also a good time to make new friends. 



Page 152 



■\ , 







The end of the Frosh Trot was also 
rewarding for the sophomores who 
remade old acquaintances. 



There's more to the Frosh Trot than just 
walking— as some found out. 



Page 153 



retreat 

spiritual pause given in study 
by student body 

Following the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius 
Loyola for three days immediately before Thanks- 
giving, the students of the College took a break from 
their academic routine to review their lives and to re- 
new their spiritual fervor. An annual affair, the retreat 
brought to the forefront of consideration the always 
present, sometimes overlooked, and most important 
aspect of man's life— his final end and the means to 
attain it. 

"Not by bread alone does man live but by every 
word that comes from the mouth of God." In today's 
materialistic environment the seeking after bread as- 
sumes such importance that the word of God is some- 
times overlooked in the rush. Hence, the period of 
the retreat, with its lectures, prayers, spiritual reading, 
silence and solitude gave to each willing student the 
opportunity to concentrate on the word rather than on 
the bread. Its attraction to the mature student was 
evidenced by the wholehearted attendance at the 
exercises and by the spirit of religious cooperation 
that prevailed. 




One of the requisites for a good retreat is spiritual talks, 
here the underclassmen enter the chapel to better them- 
selves through one of these many talks. 



Fr. Harris, the guest speaker for the underclassmen's retreat, il- 
lustrates the different spiritual exercises and requirements which 
constitute an outstanding Catholic. 





Students lounge along one of the stone walls which surrounds 
the campus, meditating on the spiritual thoughts brought forth 
in lecture by the Jesuit retreatmaster. 



At the closing of retreat Fr. Clark celebrates benediction, and 
gives final blessing to retreatants. 




retreat highlighted by 
rioted guest retreatmasters 

The success of the retreat depends not only upon 
the attitudes that the students bring to it but also upon 
the excellence and ability of the retreat masters. This 
year the retreatants were particularly fortunate in 
having the Reverend Charles Clark, S.J., for the senior 
retreat master and the Reverend Edward Harris, S.J., 
for master of the underclassmen's retreat. 

Father Clark came to Regis from St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, where he is fondly referred to as the "hoodlum 
priest" because of his untiring efforts to bring hope 
and salvation to the criminals and derelicts of that 
city. Glowing with the fire of true Christian charity, 
he impressed upon the minds of the retreatants the 
necessity for loving one's fellows in this day of selfish 
materialism. It was not just lip service to the com- 
mandment of love that he preached but selfless service 
to the needy, and a helping hand to the down and out. 
In keeping with the work to which he has devoted 
himself, Father Clark's particular favorite amongst 
the saints is Dismas, the Good Thief, whose example 
he holds up for all to emulate. 

No stranger to the Regis campus, Father Harris re- 
turned this year to conduct the retreat for the under- 
classmen. Directing his remarks to the younger 
members of the student body, he plotted for them a 
course through the rock-strewn waters of life as it 
now confronts them. 

Following the traditional idea of the Jesuits, the 
two retreat masters showed the students the meaning 
of the problems that confront them and gave them the 
means to surmount them. 



Page 155 



lecture series 

great appreciation of lecture 
series expressed by college 

All there is to learn cannot possibly be covered in 
the classroom. As a means of filling in some of the 
gaps, the Regis College Lecture Series was offered 
during this past year. Covering such widely divergent 
topics as the Dead Sea Scrolls and Modern Literary 
Criticism, the series presented something of interest 
to practically everyone. 

In the first lecture, the Reverent Benjamin L. 
Masse, S. J., associate editor of America, discussed the 
Rerum Novarum and Quadragessimo Anno in rela- 
tion to present-day economics and concluded that 
much of what the Popes had written has since been 
accepted in this country. Perhaps the dynamic climax 
of his lecture was Father Masse's denunciation of the 
so-called "Right-to-Work" bills against which he has 
been actively campaigning for twenty years. 

"Modern Protestant Theological Positions" was the 
title of the second lecture, delivered by the noted 
scholar and author, the Reverent Gustave Weigel, S. J., 
professor of ecclesiology at Woodstock College, Mary- 
land. Stressing the fact that there are no "schools" of 
Protestant theology, the speaker grouped prevailing 
opinion into three categories: fundamentalism or con- 
servative evangelicalism, liberalism or naturalism, and 
neo-orthodoxy. The major difference between Cathol- 
icism and Protestantism, according to Father Weigel, 
lies in the former's approach to God through the 
medium of the Church as opposed to the latter's in- 
sistence on the individual's immediate experience of 
his Creator. 




Fr. Stansel, S.J., introduces evening's lecturer, Fr. Masse, S.J. 




Fr. Weigel, S.J. delivers lecture as Fr. Ma- 
ginnis, S.J. listens attentively. 



Large audience typifies student response to 
series. 



Page 156 




Fr. Boyle, S.J. delivers shrewd thrusts at scientists, during 
his lecture on literary criticism. 

lecture series becomes annual event 



From Jerusalem and the midst of the Arab-Israeli 
conflict came the Reverent Robert North, S. J., an in- 
ternationally known biblical scholar, to deliver the 
third lecture in the series, "Suez, Sinai and the Dead 
Sea Scrolls." With graphically interesting color slides of 
the Sinai Peninsula and the Holy Land, Father North 
illustrated his account of the wanderings of the Israel- 
ites under Moses and of the finding of the Dead Sea 
Scrolls. As Director of the Jerusalem branch of the 
Pontifical Biblical Institute of Rome, the speaker has 
worked very closely with the scrolls, and explained 
their relation to the Scriptures and other historical 
knowledge of the people of the Holy Land just prior 
to the time of Christ. 

The Reverend Robert R. Boyle, S. J., head of the 



department of English at Regis College, was the last 
lecturer in the fall series. In his talk on "Modern 
Literary Criticism," Father Boyle explained the end 
of poetry as an "object of contemplation." Defending 
the teaching of literature as appealing to the highest 
capacity of man— contemplation— in opposition to the 
sciences which are directed merely to cognition, the 
speaker observed that "there are no notebooks in 
heaven." 

This, the College's first such series of lectures by 
outstanding authorities in their fields, made so meri- 
torious an impression on student body and faculty 
alike as to insure the continuance of the project in the 
future. 



Page 157 



night classes 

students attend regis night 
for college degree 

Evening classes at Regis are another facet of the 
college's effort to serve the Rocky Mountain area. 
Rusy, daytime industrialists find the night 
school helpful not only for their lives and work but 
even as a source of agreeable companionship. These 
same benefits are happily gathered in by work-bound 
or house-bound women. Of course, the resident stu- 
dents, seeing more than one "advantage" to night 
classes, hurry across campus too at six-thirty in the 
evening to Loyola Hall. 

The "nocturnal watchers at the font of wisdom" 
range from seventeen to sixty in age; but that is 
only a mathematical expression of chronology. It fails 
to catch the general spirit of purposefulness, com- 
panionship and gaiety that prevails among them. Many 
a night they close the Student Center after a two and 
half hour session in L6 or L10 or CR1. Facts and 
meanings are discussed, "dates" are made, car pools 
flourish before and after classes. It is from the night 
school, too, that the Regis Women's Sodality, for the 
most part, recruits its members. 

Although the night school is an integral part of 
the College and is just as demanding as any other 
division in the classroom, it has its own director. Mr. 
Francis Kiene, who assists Fr. Mattione, S.J. To- 
gether with the many devoted professional and busi- 
ness men and women on the faculty and his two 
devoted assistants, Mrs. George Mueller and Mrs. 
William Walsh, Mr. Kiene guides, directs and counsels 
some three hundred students through Regis' night- 
shadowed halls of learning each semester. 




Dan Elredge and Paul Frey check the bulletin board 
in Loyola Hall for information concerning night schedules. 




Students line up in front of Mr. Coyne's and Fr. 
Mattione's office to get help in setting up their 
schedules and for the coming semester. 




Mike Klein and John Cambria keep the book 
store open at night for those students who don't 
have the opportunity during the day for ob- 
taining books. 



Page 158 







: ?Ssfii$9H&ttffe**v :; ■ 



The lights of the night school gleam upon the trampled snow 
typifying the day-worker's efforts to further his education. 




It is often necessary for students to consult 
directors concerning their pursuits of education, 
as they are shown here with Fr. Stansell, S.J. 



Page 159 



dances 



freshman sweetheart 

With the soft strains of the music of Ray Kemp's 
orchestra wafting across the Lincoln Room of the 
Shirley Savoy Hotel, the fall social season at Regis 
College got underway. The first dance of the semester 
—and in many ways the most exciting— the Freshman 
Sweetheart Dance represents the culmination of the 
efforts of the sophomore class and the student senate 
to give the newcomers to Regis their first taste of 
college social life and to provide the upperclassmen 
with an opportunity to get back into the swing of 
things after the long summer vacation. 

For the Freshmen guests of honor the climax of 
the ball was the presenting of various awards tradi- 
tional at the end of freshmen initiation. Patsy Gales 
was chosen from among five Loretto Freshmen to 
reign as queen of the ball with the runners-up con- 
stituting her court: Sheila Maun, Pat Dunn, Barbara 
Jorgenson, and Mary Jo Hughes. 

Singled out as outstanding freshman was Vince 
Bocklage, and as most humorous was "Judge" McCarty. 
Taking honors as most spirited was Brice Buehler while 
Jake Downes was recognized as glutton for punish- 
ment. 

As both a climax and a beginning the Sweetheart 
Dance was highly successful: as climax to the fresh- 
men initiation it put the final touch to the newcomers' 
introduction to college life and as the beginning of the 
fall social season it presaged great things to come. 




Michelli and Taylor try to beat the crowd to 
the parking lot. 




Vince Bocklage receives the Outstanding Freshman award 
from Charlie McCarthy. 



Tony Cloutman and George Meredith finally locate their dates. 



Page 160 





Queen of the Freshman Sweetheart Dance, Patsy Gales, 
is escorted to her throne by Jim Lindeman. 




Outstanding Freshmen pose with their trophies and the 
Queen of the Freshman Dance. 



Jim Obst and friend try to look casual for our 
photographer. 




Page 161 



halloween dance 



The night of October 31 provided the Regis frol- 
ickers with the first big dance of the season, the an- 
nual Halloween Dance sponsored by Alpha Delta 
Gamma. The costumes matched the very atmosphere 
of the ball— lively and full of fun— while the refresh- 
ments, sweet apple cider and doughnuts, measured up 
to the usual good taste and plentiful supply associated 
with the fraternity. The music alternated between 
Jimmy Dorsey and Pat Boone with a little Elvis and 
company thrown in to satisfy the rock 'n roll crowd 
and still provide good danceable renditions. 

Probably the most interestingly costumed group 
present was the assemblage of "Little Boys Blue" with 
their charming "Little Bow Peeps" adding a dash of 
youthful color and exuberance to the affair. First prize 
for most novel and exotic attire went to Tom Luttrell 
and his exciting date who came as the leads of "The 
King and I," complete even to the king's non-existent 
hairline. Cash prizes for the winners were presented 
by Terry Welsh, treasurer of the fraternity. 

As with any other gala evening the hands on the 
clock moved inexorably to the witching hour of mid- 
night when Cinderella's coach again became pumpkin 
and ghosts and broom-riders took to the air. But in 
the afterglow of a successful evening it was readily 
apparent that everyone had enjoyed themselves for, 
in the tradition of their predecessors in ADG, the 
present membership had given the students a most 
pleasant— albeit somewhat hectic— evening of eerie fun. 




K 




Go ahead and take it, but please don't put it in the 
yearbook. 




Will the secretary please read the minutes? 



Egad, what did you put in that drink? 



Page 162 





Aw, Cmon honey, I wanna dance! 



presentation ball 

The traditional kick-off for the Queen of Regis 
campaign was held on November 8 at the Wolhurst 
Country Club. The brothers of Alpha Kappa Psi 
again did the honors in providing the music of Joe 
Marcus and his orchestra for the Presentation Ball. 
A crowd that practically overflowed tire plush ball- 
room and several interesting anterooms of the secluded 
country club testified to the overwhelming success of 
the evening. 

As the start of the queen campaign, the dance pro- 
vided an opportunity for introducing to the student 
body the lovely candidates for the honor. Daphne 
Baine, vivacious Pi Beta Phi from Colorado University, 
was the host fraternity's candidate. Representing Alpha 
Delta Gamma was Sheila Ryan, charming Loretto 
Heights sophomore. KREG presented a demure and 
lovely Tri Delt from Colorado University, Gloria 
Green. The Denver Club offered a local working girl, 
brunette Winnie Lohr. And Judy Vendenna, local 
assistant sales manager for a chain of women's shops, 
was the choice of the Italian Club. With a bevy of 
such beauties contending for the crown the campaign 
was spirited and interesting. 

As midnight's curfew tolled the knell of parting 
joy the dancers dispersed, remembering fondly the 
gaiety of the evening and looking forward with excited 
anticipation to the month-long campaign ahead to 
further their candidate's chances of being chosen 
Queen of Regis. 





Candidates for Queen of Regis pose for the RANGER 
photographer. 




What's a good kid like you doing working in a place like 
this? 



Oh, Mother, if you could only see 
your little daughter now. 




Page 164 



There's absolutely nothing like having a date with an 
amateur magician. 




Sheila Ryan, Alpha Delta Gamma candidate 
for Queen, is introduced by master of cere- 
monies, Larry Brady. 



Page 165 



coronation ball 

Social climax of the fall semester was the Corona- 
tion Ball on the evening of December 3. Sponsored, 
as has become traditional, by the Alpha Delta Gamma 
fraternity, the ball filled the Aviation Country Club to 
overflowing. 

George Morrison and his band, long a popular 
musical aggregation with the Regis students, played 
for the approximately two hundred and fifty couples 
that made the ball the overwhelming success that it 
was. 

Highlighting the gala affair, and climaxing several 
weeks of active campaigning, was the crowning of 
the new Queen of Regis, Miss Gloria Green, blonde, 
gray-eyed member of Delta Delta Delta Sorority at 
Colorado University. Sponsored by KREG, the camp- 
us radio station, Miss Green was chosen by the student 
body from a group of five candidates for the honor. 
Attendants to the queen were Miss Sheila Ryan, es- 
corted by Ray Meyer of Alpha Delta Gamma, Miss 
Daphne Baine, escorted by Vince Mangus of Alpha 
Kappa Psi, Miss Winnie Lohr, escorted by Dave Eby 
of the Denver Club, and Miss Judy Vendenna, escorted 
by Dave Vitry of the Italian Club. 

As evidenced by the large and lively group of 
Regians and dates in attendance, the Coronation Ball 
took its place in the long tradition of similarly out- 
standing social affairs organized by the brothers of 
ADG. 




Terry Sheehy presents Gloria Green with the 
traditional bouquet of Roses. 




Master of ceremonies, Terry Sheehy, announces the 
queen of Regis. 




Either someone's awfully thirsty or somebody brought 
a camel into the dance. 




Joe doesn't have much to say, but he can get his point 
across. 



Page 166 



•* 



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■;-iP»;,., .. -.mm'-- ■ m£ 



o 








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QUEEN OF REGIS 



A nineteen year old Colorado University sophomore, 
5' 4", honey-blond, poised, friendly, smiling— this is the 
girl that Regis College chose for its 1958-1959 queen. 
Striking gray-blue eyes, a low, soft voice, and a sincere 
interest in the group of Regians which always surrounded 
her, leave no doubt as to the identity of this Colorado 
Springs coed, Miss Gloria Green. 



Gloria is a girl of widely varied interests. Primary 
places in her life are held by her family, religion, scholastic 
work, sorority activities, many friends, and now Regis 
College. And to each of these she is the same: generous, 
observant, hard working. She typifies what is popularly 
described as an "All American girl." She is a girl whom 
we may be proud to call the "Queen of Regis." 



Page 169 




ATTENDANT 

Mi&i £Ueila Ryan 



Hails from Pender, Nebraska . . . music major 
. . . sophomore at Loretto Heights College . . . 
choice of Alpha Delta Gamma brothers . . . likes 
skiing and horseback riding . . . spirited cheer- 
leader for the Rangers . . . accomplished drummer 
. . . leaves a lasting impression. 



ATTENDANT 

MiM ^bafilwie flame 



Sophomore from San Francisco . . . vivacious 
. . . attends University of Colorado ... Pi Phi . . . 
Newman Club member . . . avid golfer and tennis 
player . . . sponsored by Alpha Kappa Psi . . . 
member of CU's Associated Students . . . glowing 
and resplendent smile. 




I 




ATTENDANT 

Mia Winnie leJvi 



Denverite career girl . . . hobbies are skiing, 
tennis, and music . . . represented the Denver 
Club . . . epitome of graciousness . . . shines in 
friendliness and sincerity . . . raven-haired . . . 
likes to model . . . pert and lively personality . . . 
beautiful. 



ATTENDANT 

Mite Judy Vendetuia 



Hails from Denver . . . personality in person 
. . . carried banner for Italian Club . . . executive 
in women's world . . . interested in feminine fash- 
ion and the drama . . . loves to dance . . . has beau- 
tiful Italian features . . . likes summer sports . . . 
radiant and poised. 




SWEETHEART 
ATTENDANT 

MiM Qaibasia fjwcfewAjcm 





SWEETHEART 
ATTENDANT 

Mm Many {/a JfufUed 



SWEETHEART 
ATTENDANT 

Mite Pat jbunn 



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ATTENDANT 

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Page 175 



FRESHMAN 
SWEETHEART 

MiM Poky QaUi 



Comes from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma . . . 
likes the mountains . . . attends Loretto Heights 
. . . has a pleasing southern accent ... in demand 
. . . loves to swim . . . lives in the sun . . . laughs a 
lot . . . glows with personality . . . sparkling brown 
hair . . . radiates friendliness and charm ... in- 
telligent . . . good choice. 




prom king charles mc earthy 



Page 177 



kbtv 



television program acclaimed 
for educational value 

Colorado's oldest educational television program, 
Today at Regis, continued its presentations of college 
lectures on topics of current interest for the viewers of 
the Denver area. Every Sunday afternoon over KBTV 
one of the professors from the college faculty, often 
assisted by several honor students, presents one of the 
series in conjunction with the directors of the pro- 
gram, the Rev. Lucuis Cervantes, S. J., and Tip 
Cowan, student director. 

The series was opened by the Rev. Joseph Downey, 
S. J., with a lecture augmented with slides and 
charts. His subject was the geological formation of 
the earth and how differing theories of this formation 
clash with religious dogma and teaching. 

The chemistry department followed physicist 
Downey as Dr. Ozog presented another convincing 
and interesting lecture on the timely topics of how 
various products can be commissionally extracted from 
common sea water. The growing scarcity of the rela- 
tive supply of the earth's water and other drought 
problems of the area caused the programs to be ex- 
pecially well received. 

The entertaining and scholarly head of the college 
English department Fr. Boyle, S.J., delivered an attack 
upon the mistaken idea that speed reading can be suc- 
cessfully applied to poetry. 




Student director, Tip Cowan, acts as prompter 
to deliver cues of time remaining to Fr. Boyle, 
S.J., during his lecture on English Poetry. 




Cameraman strives to obtain a clear focus of 
Fr. Boyle to get different facial expressions 
during presentation. 



TV director stands by to instruct cameraman 
on the many various views and positions which 
are necessary to achieve during the show. 



Page 178 




Seeking the opinions of the children, Mr. John 
Flanagan questions children's views during 
education program. 



social life 

social whirl provides diversion 
from routine study 

An existence totally devoted to labour results in an 
apathetic individual. Hence the maturing college stu- 
dent takes those breaks from his academic pursuits 
necessary to insure the rounding-out, the completing 
of his personality. These digressions can be formal or 
informal, planned or casual. Friday afternoons gen- 
erally see the casual beginnings of a weekend of social 
jollity, most probably at one of the local beer dis- 
pensaries like Slim's, Billy's or the Sunnyside— except 
for the more energetic who may be found on the 
tennis courts or heading west for a weekend on the 
slopes, depending on the season. 

Friday evenings continue the spirit of informality, 
with Regians and dates heading to Tulagi's for an 
evening of dancing or, for the more athletic, there is 
bowling, skating or, for the sedentary, attending a 
basketball or hockey game. 

A shift to the more formal is found on Saturday 
evenings and swankier places, such as the Tiffin or 
Henritze's, get the play. Denver's offerings of drama, 
symphony, and opera likewise attract the many 
Regians interested in the fine arts. 




Mike Wanebo takes time out from study to make plans 
for the coming week-end. 





Friday at last and Mike picks up 
his date. 



Sister, I'd like you to meet the internationally known 
Play-boy 



Page 180 




Ed Powers finds a new exercise which is 
quickly replacing the Bar-Bell. 








The informal atmosphere of the Sportsman's 
Inn is captured by Tom Connolly and Katha 
Geary. 



Ed Boyce and Mary Gebert seem to be really 
living it up while attending one of the cocktail 
parties before a dance. 



Page 181 



night lift 




Jim Butler, Tom Luepke, and Tom Dean 
and dates enjoy a typically informal Fri- 
day night at one of the many spots 
available around town. 





While at Tulagi's John Lindeman ex- 
plains a point to his date, Judy Sweiger. 



Hoover contemplates the question "Should 
I or shouldn't I?" He didl 



Page 182 



8SS3&" 




Tom Dean and Marge Ely are fol- 
lowed by Dave Rottino and Mary St. 
Peter into the Outrigger Restaurant 
in the Cosmopolitan Hotel. 



Page 183 



apartment life 

apartments gam in popularity 
among college students 

One of the pleasures of life least available to the 
man in the dorm is raiding a refrigerator. Not the 
least of the advantages of apartment living is just this 
availability. A certain independence, a latitude in 
hours— call it what you will— characterizes the off- 
campus bachelor's life. This life, of course, can be 
fraught with many dangers. Eating one's own cook- 
ing can be an adventure in bravado, while negotiating 
the maze called supermarket can make even the most 
intrepid individualist think longingly of the cafeteria 
on campus. 

Privacy and peace and quiet conducive to study 
are probably the most scholastically useful advantages 
of an apartment, for rarely does one find dormitory- 
confusion in an apartment building. This is not to 
overlook some of the other niceties available to the 
apartment dweller. Parties that could never pass the 
frigid eye of a prefect are taken as a matter of course 
off campus while the simple beauty of getting one's 
beer from the kitchen instead of from a bartender is 
not to be scoffed at. 

With the attractions of such a mode of college 
life, it is not surprising that many students choose 
apartment living while many others would follow if 
they could. 




.J 



Gene Cavaliere consults with a former dinner guest 
about the merits of his special cocktail mix. 



Perhaps the most favored pastime 
among apartment dwellers is lounging 
on their splendid furniture. 




Not only are apartments good for parties but diey are 
also quite good places in which to study quietly. 



Page 184 




Gene Cavaliere shows his apartment visitor Mike Klein 
some of his classical hi-fi recordings. 




Tom Connolly tends to one of the unpleasant 
duties which is an integral part of apartment 
living. 



Probably the least disputed fact is that 
apartments offer much more comfortable 
quarters than are to be found in the campus 
residence halls. 




married life 

student couples combine 
college and marriage 

"Two can live as cheaply as one," but the adage 
never said what happens when the third or fourth 
comes along. A relatively large number of Regis stu- 
dents are finding out in what might be called the hard 
way. Going to school, holding down full or part time 
jobs, contending with squalling babies, placating 
wives who feel ignored, coping with the mysteries of 
housekeeping, and studying philosophy make a com- 
bination before which the strongest of men might 
quail but many a dedicated student and husband 
successfully surmounts all such obstacles in attaining 
his degree. 

Even scholastically, however, marriage offers an 
advantage that the bachelor does not enjoy. Consider 
the student in Father Cervantes' class: which one, the 
bachelor or the husband, is better prepared for the 
erudite papers demanded on such subjects as "Teach- 
ing Your Child the Facts of Life" or "All Together 
for Togetherness?" And, further, a wife who has al- 
ready studied literature and philosophy can be of in- 
estimable help to the business student confronted with 
a term paper for Father Boyle or Father Klocker. 

The compensation and the distractions, the adage 
and the extravagance that disproves it— these are parts 
of the life known only to the married amongst the 
students. 




Returning from morning classes Frank Maggio enjoys lunch 
with his wife. 



Studying becomes ever harder as Gene Maize's small children 
badger him to play with them for awhile. 




Page 186 




Will Clark breaks from the study- 
work routine as he and his wire 
Marge, take their httle girl for a ride 



Page 187 



intramural skiing 

winter sport holds 
high popularity 

From the first snow at Thanksgiving to the closing 
of the tow lines in May, from the hot buttered rum 
in December to the keg races in April, the skiers of 
Regis may be found in various states of fractured 
mind and limb. 

The skiers cheerfully go about clobbering them- 
selves either as eager novice snow-bunnies or as aces 
taking fiendish delight in showing off their prowess 
to discouraged beginners. 

Because of the unparalleled excellence of the snow 
and the magnificient ski area, skiing ranks first in the 
interest of the vast majority of the students. From 
Thanksgiving to May when the last of the die-hards 
don Bermuda shorts the campus is a virtual week-end 
ghost town. 

The invariable pilgrimage to Aspen during tire 
semester break is the high point of the season for the 
novice and expert alike and the best remembered of 
all the skiing adventures. 




One of the reasons for the sport's high 
popularity is the meeting of friends to 
which Chris O'Donnell can well attest. 




Page 188 



A group of skiers meet at the bottom to discuss which 
run to attempt next. 




The finish gate of a race in which the varsity skiers are taking 
part is a popular meeting place for those not proficient at the sport. 



Skiing with a date is a pleasant way to while away the 
time spent in the tow lines. 




*"Ti ? 



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The panorama of the popular Winter Park ski area 
stretches before the view of the skier. 



«a*d 



Page 189 



labs 



physical science courses 
key to modern age 

"To impart the greatest possible amount of knowledge 
with the least possible amount of bodily harm to the student" 
this is the aim of the natural science laboratory courses at 
Regis College. With this object in mind the lab instructors 
take to their job, intent on preventing the aspiring surgeon 
or chemist from amputating a finger or bathing himself in 
acid. Freshman pre-engineering and pre-medical students 
are introduced to the intricacies of the Chemistry and Biology 
Labs during their first year at Regis. 

Those who are interested in the biological sciences con- 
tinue through Vertebrae Anatomy, Embryology, and Histol- 
ogy while those students of engineering, chemistry, or 
physics are subjected to the difficult but interesting laboratory 
courses in Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis. 





Better put this one back on solids. 



The last guy that said that to 
me got acid in his face. 



Wonder how it would taste with 
a dash of vermouth? 



Page 190 





Amid the maze of transformers and slide rules, 
these young physicists ponder a tricky problem. 





Dear Honey-bun. 



The final draft of the lab report is completed 
in Biology. 



Page 191 



classes 



heart of the college 

"As a liberal arts college, Regis College is con- 
ducted to promote the spiritual, intellectual, moral, 
and aesthetic advancement of its students." To this 
end courses are offered that aim toward the develop- 
ment of mature, thinking students with a grasp of 
broad areas of learning as well as a knowledge of 
the specialized field that the students may wish to 
pursue. 

Clear, logical, accurate thinking ability is incul- 
cated through such courses as metaphysics, matiie- 
matics, and the natural sciences; the ability of clear and 
forceful self - expression through language, public 
speaking, and composition; a knowledge of human 
nature through literature, and of the past through his- 
tory; an understanding of the present, a contemporary 
social awareness, and an attitude of social and civic 
responsibility through the social sciences and modem 
history; and a clear knowledge and appreciation of 
ultimate religious, philosophical, and moral values 
through theology and philosophy, which, at Regis, 
are especially emphasized. 




Many students take pride in their books 
of knowledge. Here Don Pacheco gleefully 
exposes one of his many books. 




During the afternoon many engineering 
students spend extensive time in the en- 
gineering drawing class held in Carroll 
Hall. 



On the student's time out of class, he often 
compares notes and collects opinions or 
other students on the covered material. 



Page 192 




Students concentrate in Mr. Belton's English class while taking 
one of the many required exams. 




A freshman history course is conducted by Mr. 
Sheehan, during the first semester of studies. 



Illustrating through visual aids the forms and rules of taxes, Mr. 
Dolan makes certain that each student understands thoroughly. 



Page 193 



dramatic production 

-players successfully produce 
pulitler prh-e play. 

"All the world's a stage and all the men and women 
in it merely players." This quote from the immortal 
bard holds true at least for a number of Regis thes- 
pians who spend long hours each semester in arduous 
preparation for the college dramatic productions. 

In years long past the Sacred Heart Dramatic 
Society achieved a reputation for fine theater through 
the acclaim lavished on it by early theater-goers 
throughout the Rocky Mountain region. 

This tradition of excellence has been carried on by 
the Regis College Playhouse founded in 1954 by the 
students in co-operation with the Reverend A. J. Dee- 
man, S. J. Since that time it has presented eleven 
outstanding productions. 

The main production this year was the hilarious 
family comedy by Moss Hart and George S. Kauf- 
man, "You Can't Take It With You," presented at 
Ronfils Memorial Theater during the middle of No- 
vember. The cast of seven women and twelve men 
turned in performances of the high calibre that has 
become usual in Playhouse productions. 

Arthur Miller's dramatic masterpiece, "All My 
Sons," was the thespian piece-de-resistance of the sec- 
ond semester. A cutting was presented over KRTV in 
March and other presentations were made at local 
hospitals. 




Pat Hughes plays the distinguished part of the 
Russian in the play "Yon Can't Take It With 
You." 




Larry Clinton (Mr. De Pinna) poses as an 
ancient Greek for Mary Jo Catlett (Penny) 
who considers her work among the best. 



Dennis Gallagher registers bewilderment as 
his world seemingly crashes about his ears, as 
the police barge in. 



Page 194 




Pat Hughes gets trimmed by Dick Chiodini 
prior to going on the stage for the play held at 
Bonfils Memorial Theater. 



Page 195 



dorm life 

residence halls provide 
new living environment 



For the boarder coming to drink from the fountain of 
knowledge known as Regis College, life takes on a completely 
new atmosphere. Any similarity between home sweet home 
and O'Connell or Carroll Hall is strictly coincidental. These 
two modern— or partially modernized— edifices of brick and 
steel shelter more than just men and their belongings. They 
shelter a maturing and polishing process that begins the in- 
stant the green freshman first sets foot inside the door and 
ends only when the veteran senior packs his bag and hurries 
to catch the home-bound train the morning after commence- 
ment. 

The process includes many things— peace and quiet (de- 
sired but rare) and confusion and pandemonium (inevitable 
and frequent), roommates (necessaiy and, generally, satisfy- 
ing) and prefects (restrictive but helpful), bull sessions 
(spirited and time-consuming) and near-riots (exuberantly 
gratifying and expensive). 

Communal life at its best and at its worst can be found 
juxtaposed in the dorms, O'Connell for the underclassmen 
and Carroll for the upper. Getting to know one's fellows— 
amongst stereophonic sounds, bridge games and concentrated 
study sessions— is probably the most rewarding facet of dormi- 
tory life. 






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What a Christmas this will be! 





Is a girl really worth all of this? 



But Father, it was all in fun. 











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The Miller's Tale 




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spare time 
. . . never enough 




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Page 198 




■ * — -*0&f^. 





Spare time is defined as that which no one ever 
has enough of and which everyone could use more 
of even if he had a lot of it. Spare time might also 
be called just killing time and the Regis student is a 
past master at the art of losing minutes. Conversations 
can be lengthy but the real time consumer is that 
great conversation-killer, television. Some men can 
stick to the set through a whole evening, starting with 
Steve Allen and holding out to the end of the last com- 
mercial after the late-late-late show. The devotees— 
and they are devoted— of bridge can while away many 
a pleasant hour at their favorite game and the hours 
spent over the board by the chess players are pro- 
verbial. 

Solving the world's problems is no easy matter and 
many cups of coffee can be consumed over a period 
of many hours at this task in the Student Center. The 
dedicated hobbyist uses his spare hours pursuing any 
of a number of interesting, educational and exacting 
hobbies. But however the hours are spent, be they in 
doing or just thinking, few of them are really lost for 
something is to be gained from any contact with 
others or with ourselves. 



Page 199 



political life 

voice of the people 

A smoke-filled room, men of serious mien enter 
and leave, low-voiced conferences are held, runners 
scurry in and out with information, campaign man- 
agers plot last minute strategy— is it Tammany Hall 
on the eve of election day? No, it's Carroll Hall just 
before the election of a new Executive Board. 

The senator rises to a point or order, the chair- 
man sustains him, point well taken, debate shifts, con- 
tinues—is it the Army- McCarthy hearings? No, it's 
the monthly meeting of the Regis College Student 
Senate. 

The president calls the meeting to order, minutes 
are read, report from the treasurer is accepted, the 
vice-president reads his report on a special project- 
is it the weekly meeting of the President's cabinet? 
No, it's the Executive Board plotting the course of 
student government in its weekly meeting. 

All-out campaigns, hopeful candidates making 
speeches and button-holing voters, election day and 
the students registering their choices on the voting 
machines, public parliamentary meetings, and the 
star-chamber of the Executive Board— these are all 
part of student politics at Regis. 




One of the members of Party X, Mike Klein, 
explains to Mike Dunn their aims and ideals. 




Students get their names checked off 
by Tom Dean and Ed Powers while 
standing at the polls. 



Computing the results 
of the votes are Ed 
Powers, Gene Cavalier, 
Charlie McCarthy, and 
Fr. Malechek, S. J. 



Page 200 








Voting machines are used for all major 
elections held on campus. Here Jerry 
Shea is shown after exercising his 
right. 




Anything is used to attract the attention of the students 
to let them know who is running. Here Regis MaUoy 
and Ben Cosimi comment on the exhibition. 




During election week the walls 
of Carroll, O'Connell, and Loyola 
Halls are covered with posters to 
inform other students of their 
candidates. 



Page 201 



awards banquet 

second annual affair 

The Second Annual Awards Banquet was success- 
fully staged on March 1, 1959. As begun last year, 
the banquet served as an occasion to reward publicly 
the men of Regis who have complied an outstanding 
record while at the College, either scholastically, 
athletically, or through leadership in co-curricular 
activities. In addition to the recognition accorded 
student leaders, three prominent alumni also received 
awards for outstanding contributions to Regis. John 
J. Sullivan received the Silver Spur award for out- 
standing achievement in his profession; Edmund L. 
Mullen was recipient of a similar award for out- 
standing service to the College; and Thomas J. Tynan 
was recognized as an Honorary Ranger. 

Main speaker of the evening was Brigadier Gen- 
eral Henry R. Sullivan, Jr., USAF, Commandant of 
Cadets at the United States Air Force Academy, who 
spoke on "Responsibilities of Leadership." Announc- 
ing tire alumni awards was Albert E. Zarlengo, presi- 
dent of the National Regis Club; student awards 
were announced by Regis P. Malloy, master of cere- 
monies, and Blair Farrell, president of the Student 
Senate. The Veiy Reverend Richard F. Ryan, S. J., 
president of Regis, made the presentation of both 
student and alumni awards. 

Sponsored by the Student Senate, the Awards 
Banquet was engineered by the Sodality under the 
co-chairmanship of Don Dierks and Bob Swanson. 




General Sullivan delivers his keynote speech at 
the banquet. 




Student Senate president Blair Farrell speaks 
to the dinner guests. 



Master of ceremonies Regis Malloy pauses dur- 
ing the announcement of award winners. 




Page 202 




Dinner guests listen as General Sullivan speaks on leadership. 



Fr. Mattione, Dean, speaks to one of the dinner guests. 



College president Fr. Ryan addresses the as- 
sembly. 





Page 203 




- : '•'■'■' ■ 



res 



ml 



1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 204 



■ 



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T 




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E 
T 
I 
C 
S 



Page 205 



ranger coaches 

behind the action, behind the team 



Head coach, Harvey Moore, in his sLxth season at 
Regis College, again guided the Regis five to a winning 
season despite facing the strongest teams ever to confront 
one of his squads. In preserving his record of never having 
a losing season at Regis, Moore led the Rangers to victory 
over such big name teams as Colorado State University 
and Idaho State. 

Moore was a standout in his own playing days, as a 
forward for the renowned Regis "Buzz Boys" of the late 
1940's, was named the National Catholic Invitational 
Tournament All- American squad in 1949. He was the 
Rocky Mountain region's leading scorer in the 1946-47 
season. 

After graduation, Moore went into college and high 
school coaching. He returned to Regis as Head Basketball 
Coach in the fall of 1953. Since that time, the calibre of 
Ranger basketball has steadily climbed to the heights that 
the hoopsters aggregation attained during the past season. 

With such a man controlling basketball fortunes at 
Regis, Ranger followers are rapidly realizing their hope 
of Regis' establishing its position as one of the greats of 
the nation. 

Coach Moore's assistant this year was a newcomer to 
Regis. Joseph B. Hall comes to us from a coaching position 
at Sheperdsville, Kentucky, High School. It was there that 
he earned the award, Mid-Kentucky Conference Coach of 
the Year. Coach Hall started his collegiate basketball 
career at the University of Kentucky, where he was a 
member of the 1949 National Champion team. 




Head Coach— Harvey Moore, Assistant Coach— Joe Hall 



One of the most telling aspects of a tight game is the emotional impact mirrored on the faces 
of the coaches. Here, during the forty minutes of play, are displayed every emotion from 
initial frustration to final success. 




Page 206 



cagers carry colors of regis across nation. 



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Page 207 




VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM— Left to Right: Asst. Coach Joe Hall, Coach Harvey Moore, Tom Hitzelberger, Jim Butler, Bob Linnenberger, Terry Sheehy, 
Jerry Sherman, Howard Marshall, Ken Williams, Herb Millard, Dennis Boone, Paul Frey, Gary DeMarlie. 



scores 



Generating school spirit, the spirited cheerleaders from Regis 
and Loretto Heights faithfully led the Ranger fans through the 



Regis 


72 


Western State 


32 


Regis 


62 


Western State 


41 


Regis 


9] 


St. Michael's 


65 


Regis 


80 


Wyoming 


86 


Regis 


58 


Colo. State Univ. 


55 


Regis 


86 


Loyola U. (Calif.) 


46 


Regis 


55 


Colo. State Univ. 


53 


Regis 


71 


Idaho State College 


66 


Regis 


70 


Montana State Coll. 


76 


Regis 


60 


St. Ambrose 


59 


Regis 


68 


SW. Missouri State 


78 


Regis 


57 


Washington U. 


58 


Regis 


99 


Adams State 


66 


Regis 


79 


Oklahoma City U. 


98 


Regis 


51 


Loyola U. 


46 


Regis 


63 


Pepperdine 


83 


Regis 


72 


Fresno State 


74 


Regis 


77 


Nevada U. 


75 


Regis 


52 


Idaho State 


70 


Regis 


63 


Montana State Coll. 


67 


Regis 


76 


Air Force Academy 


79 


Regis 


64 


Portland 


69 


Regis 


122 


Adams State 


78 




Page 208 



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High above any of the invading Chiefs, forward Jim Butler 
readily controlled the boards for Regis, but the unbelievable 
shooting accuracy of Oklahoma City proved too much for 
the Ranger quintet in this tilt. 



basketball in review 

winning season marred by heartbreaking defeats 



Spectacular successes, crushing defeats, rabid 
cheering sections, and a coach hanged in effigy— all 
these contributed to the 1958-1959 Ranger basketball 
season. After compiling a convincing 7-1 record in 
their first eight outings, climaxed by the win over sixth- 
ranked Idaho State, the Rangers dropped ten of the 
last fifteen games to close the season with a 12-11 rec- 
ord. It was probably this rather discreditable second 
half of the season which prompted some of Regis' more 
rabid fans to hang Coach Harvey Moore in effigy after 
the 98-79 loss accepted at the hands of Oklahoma City 
University, top ranked team in the rugged basketball 
country of the Southwest. 

The Rangers opened the hoopster season with an 
impressive 72-32 win over Western State in the Holy 



Family gym with Boone tossing in sixteen points. The 
following night, Regis again readily romped over the 
Mountaineers, this time by a 62-41 margin. Forward 
Bob Linnenberger was especially devastating as he 
poured in fourteen points in the first ten minutes of 
action and finished with twenty points for game 
honors. The next foes to face the finely honed Rangers 
also proved easy victims for the ruthless scoring attack 
of Linnenberger, Dennis Boone, and freshman Ben 
Wesley. Enjoying the familiarity of their home court, 
the Ranger racked up ninety-one points against St. 
Michael's of Santa Fe, with Linnenberger again gain- 
ing top scoring honors with twenty-nine while Boone 
chipped in with twenty- two. 



Page 209 




The next night, however, the Rangers roared back 
in spirit from the Wyoming debacle to defeat Colorado 
State University 58-55 in the Auditorium Arena. The 
Rangers never trailed in regulation time, but the Aggies 
got off the floor to tie the score in the final fourteen 
seconds. In the thrilling overtime, the Rams quickly 
went ahead for the first time of the evening on succes- 
sive baskets. Terry Sheehy then countered with a 
tip-in but CSU again widened the margin with two 
free throws. Ben Wesley then dropped in a free throw 
and Sheehy followed with another tip-in. Regis then 
chalked up the win from the free throw line as the 
Aggie players nervously committed three successive 
fouls accounting for six points. 

In their next start, Regis demolished Loyola Uni- 
versity during the Christmas holidays with a rousing 
shooting display by Dennis Boone, Bob Linnenberger, 
and Herb Millard. Connecting on nine of their first 
eleven shots from the floor, this trio of artillerymen 
put the Rangers ahead to stay with a fourteen point 
lead after the first six minutes of action, and built it 
into a 40 point lead by the time the final gun sounded. 

Together these three Rangers collected forty-nine 
points, three more than the entire Loyola team, with 
Boone enjoying game scoring honors with twenty-three. 
Ben Wesley also turned in a sterling performance in 
his first start on the front line, chipping in with fifteen 
points along with eleven rebounds. 



Aggressive forward, Jim Butler, was the 
Ranger tiger on the boards as he pulled down 
nearly 200 rebounds during the season. 




High-flight action is usually the keynote of any jump in- 
volving Catholic All-American, Dennis Boone. His quick 
reactions, stamina, timing, and coordination, coupled 
with a fiery determination, often lift him high above 
much taller opponents. 






Stalwart forward, Bob Linnenberger, was 
the Ranger sparkplug both in rebounding 
and clutch scoring. 



Veteran center, Terry Sheehy, often led 
Regis to victory as the backbone of the 
offensive attack. 



Freshman guard, Ben Wesley, provided 
many thrills for the Ranger followers with 
his spectacular board play. 



Led by the alert ball hawking of Bob Linnenberger and 
Jerry Sherman, the Ranger squad outhustled sixth- 
ranked Idaho State at the auditorium arena to nip the 
Bengals by a 71-66 margin. 









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Slipping by three Idaho State defenders tor an apparently easy score, 
Dennis Boone treated the Ranger fans to a brilliant shooting show as he 
collected 31 points in this contest for his season high. 



Backcourt leader, Herb Millard, proved his di- 
recting abilities early in the season and quickly 
established himself as a permanent starter. 




On December 30 the Rangers journeyed to Fort 
Collins for the second tilt with the Colorado State 
Rams. This time Dennis Boone climaxed a late game 
rally, in which the Rangers overcame a nine point def- 
icit, with a thirty foot jump shot in the final seconds 
of play. This bucket with only two seconds remaining 
in the game gave the Rangers their first victory over 
the Aggie team on their home court. 

Tangling with the sixth-ranked Idaho State Ben- 
gals was the next assignment for the high-flying Rang- 
ers. Again it was Boone who backboned Regis to its 
seventh win in eights starts, riddling Idaho State's 
rugged defense for sixteen first half points and fifteen 
points in the second half. It wasn't only Boone's 
terrific shooting which steered the Rangers to this 
important victoiy, for he was also the captain of their 
ship when the Bengals threw a full court press at them. 

Because of the victory the Rangers vaulted all the 
way from twenty-third place to fifteenth in the United 
Press International's small college basketball ratings. 
This was the second highest rating ever given to the 
Rangers. 

Fresh from this 71-76 win over Idaho State, Regis 
took on Montana State, one of the Rocky Mountain 
area's top independent basketball teams on January 6. 
The Rangers, however, were far off the form they 
showed in the previous game and were toppled by a 
76-70 score. Blowing a 14 point half-time lead, the 
Rangers began their fall with this loss, which was fol- 
lowed by a series of miscues and injuries to the end 
of the season. 



Page 212 







Spectacular board play was one of the key factors in the 
success of Regis over such highly favored teams as Idaho 
State. Led by the rebounding of forward Jim Butler and the 
scoring of Dennis Boone in this game, the scrappy Rangers 
gained the fifteenth rating in the small college basketball poll. 



Page 213 






Scrappy center, Jerry Sherman, 
often sparked the Ranger offense 
with timely scoring plays. 



Dependable reliever, Paul Frey, turned in 
top defensive play as guard in his first 
year of action. 



Hustling guard, Ganj DeMarlie, proved 
more than an idle threat to many a 
Ranger opponent. 



Relievers, Ken Williams and Tom Hitzelberger, saw much action against the Western 
State Mountaineers in the first two games of the Ranger season as Regis easily chalked 
up victories over their unimpressive opponents. 




On January 12, the Regis team opened a four- 
game road trip through the Midwest with a 60-59 
win over St. Ambrose. The narrow victory at Daven- 
port, Iowa, was the Rangers' eighth of the season 
and proved to be one of the toughest to gain. Regis 
exploded early in the second half for ten straight 
points to go ahead for good. The Bees did stay within 
striking distance throughout the remainder of the con- 
test, and it was only the accuracy of Bob Linnen- 
berger, and the playmaking of Dennis Boone which 
kept the Rangers ahead of the pressing Bees. 

The next night Regis faced the unbeaten South- 
west Missouri State Bears. Regis played what Coach 
Harvey Moore called "our best game of the year," 
but the Bears showed that their perfect record was 
no fluke. The game was a nip and tuck battle with 
Terry Sheehy keeping Regis in the running with the 
best game of his four-year career. But a brief cold spell 
in the second half proved to be the Rangers' downfall 
as the Bears seized this opportunity to sack up the 
victory. 

The next tilt was with Washington University of 
St. Louis, and the St. Louis jinx again hounded the 
Rangers. The game marked the fifth time Regis has 
played Washington on the Bears' home court, and 
on each occasion the Rangers have been on the short 
end of the score. The upstart Bears took full ad- 
vantage of excessive Regis fouls for their slim 58-57 
victory. 



All-American selection, Dennis Boone, has been 
the Ranger master of the backcourt for three 
consecutive years, scoring in double figures in 
69 varsity games. 





Keeping the opposition is one of the most important factors in bringing down 
rebounds. Terry Sheehy shows that he is conscious of this fact against the 
Oklahoma City Chiefs as he ably controls the ball. 



When the Rangers returned to their home state 
the next week after these heartbreaking losses, they 
were men of determination. In this outing, Regis 
swept the boards so clean that they shined and pro- 
ceeded to all but run Adams State off the floor. But 
the Oklahoma City Chiefs who invaded Denver three 
nights later quickly cut short the jubilation that this 
victory aroused. 

The Chiefs unveiled the hottest shooting team the 
Rangers had faced and hit an almost unbelievable 
62.2% of their shots. Although the Regis starters made 
a valiant bid to change the complexion the second 
half, they just couldn't get back into the thick of the 
game after the first half which left them down by 15 
points and finally bowed to a 98-79 score. 

Carrying a 9-5 record with them, the Rangers de- 
parted on an eight-day, five-game junket through the 
West on January 29. The first game, against Loyola 
of Los Angeles, saw Freshman Jerry Sherman come 
off the bench in the second half to lead Regis to a 
51-46 victory. 

Two days later the Rangers faced Pepperdine with 
star Bob Linnenberger on the injured role. Only Boone, 
Sheehy, and Sherman gave Pepperdine any trouble; 
but their efforts were not enough to overcome the 
early lead that Pepperdine had massed. 

Against their next foes, fifteenth ranked Fresno 
State, the Mooremen heartily sought an upset behind 
the support of limping Bob Linnenberger but were 
finally defeated in two overtimes. 



Page 215 




Handy-man, Howard Marshall provided strong 
support for any front-line position and his un- 
dying spirit was often the driving force of the 
Rangers' attack. 



In the fourth game of the road trip the Rangers 
again went into overtime, tliis time to come out on 
top. Although down by four points with two minutes 
left, the Rangers gambled on a full court press and 
tied the score at 69 all at the end of regulation time. 
Sheehy was fouled just as the overtime ended, and 
his two free throws after the game gave Regis the 
victory. 

The next night the dog-tired Rangers ran com- 
pletely out of gas against rugged Idaho State. The 
Bengals, who had been soundly beaten by Regis a 
month earlier, this time stymied the Regis team scor- 
ing for a solid 70-52 victory. 

A bid to even its season basketball series with 
Montana State the next week died in the final 11 sec- 
onds of a give and take game as the Bobcats scratched 
out a 67-63 victory. 

The climatic game of die year turned out to be 
the most thrilling as 2,200 screaming fans watched the 
AFA score their first victory over Regis. The thrilling 
encounter was set up after the Falcons had apparentiy 
sewed up the game with a six point lead and only 
48 seconds left. But the Rangers miraculously came 
back to tie the score and it was only after three over- 
times that they fell before the Falcons by a 79-76 score. 

The slick Portland Pilots were the next foes to 
challenge the Rangers, and they left the Auditorium 
Arena after handing Regis its fourth straight loss. Lin- 
nenberger led all the scorers with twenty-three points. 

In the final game of the season the Rangers ex- 
ploded for 122 points in their home game to break 
the record number of points scored in the Regis gym. 



Coaching abilities are tested to their utmost during the 
consequential minutes of a time-out in a tight game 
when the much-needed encouragement and instructions 
are offered the overwrought players. 



The competent relief work at the center position by 
Jerry Sheman more than fulfilled the pre-season pre- 
dictions. This hustling freshman readily assumed the 
responsibilities and often outmaneuvered the taller and 
more experienced opposition. 










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junior varsity basketball 

iayvee program prepares men for varsity act/on 



"The aim of the Jayvee program," according to 
assistant Coach Joe Hall, "has been to familiarize 
new men with Regis' style of play, and to prepare 
them for later varsity action. This is borne ont by the 
fact that, due to injuries to varsity men, several Jay- 
vees have moved up during the season and have 
turned in good performances with the varsity." 

Probably the most important reason for the up- 
coming Jayves' unfailing success on the varsity squad 
is the fact that their mentor, Joe Hall, is a master of 
precision floor play. This fact is most clearly dis- 
played by the spectacular 15-3 season that the Jayvees 
racked up this year. 

The Regis Junior Varsity rolled to a 6-3 record 
midway through the year to establish an early claim 
to a highly creditable season. This claim was then 
more than substantiated as the Jayvees went through 
the second-half of the schedule undefeated. 

The season opened with an 82-75 loss to Fitz- 



simmons Army Hospital despite Dick Hoogerwerf's 
twenty-two points. The quintet then overcame early 
season jitters as they faced the Rocky Mountain Arse- 
nal in the Regis gym. Behind the accurate firing of 
Ken Williams and Bill Kelly, who collected nineteen 
and eighteen points respectively, the Jayvees walked 
away with a 104-60 victory. 

In their next outing the Hallmen again met the 
team that had handed them their first loss. This time, 
however, Fitzsimmons was faced by a much smoother 
team and the Junior Varsity avenged their previous 
loss by a 99-70 margin. Williams again starred with 
excellent support from Jerry Thiesen and Gary De 
Marlie who contributed 15 points each. 

After the Christmas vacation, the Rocky Mountain 
Arsenal played host to the Rangers only to lose its 
second game by a 75-64 score. Moving next to Trini- 
dad Junior College, the Junior Varsity sustained their 
second defeat of the season in a low scoring 69-47 loss. 





Deadly Ken Williams leaps high on one of his favorite outside shots on 
which he averaged fifteen points per game. 



Maneuvering for the jump shot which has lifted the guard to the 
high-scoring slot at Regis, Dick Hoogenverf slips by his defender. 




JUNIOR VARSITY— Left to Right: Jerry Tellez, Pete O'Neal, Paul Tartaglia, Dick Hoogerwerf, Jerry Theisert, Kerr Williams, Mike Christopher, Jerry Smith, 
Bill Kelly. 



"Tall man" Tom Hitzelberger was a relentless scorer throughout the 
season for the Junior Rangers and also a valuable relief man for the 
Varsity. 



scores 




Regis 


75 


Regis 


104 


Regis 


97 


Regis 


75 


Regis 


47 


Regis 


72 


Regis 


56 


Regis 


71 


Regis 


69 


Regis 


75 


Regis 


70 


Regis 


56 


Regis 


59 


Regis 


79 


Regis 


88 


Regis 


76 


Regis 


65 



Fitzsimmons Hospital 82 

Rocky Mr. Arsenal 60 

Fitzsimmons Hospital 70 

Rocky Mt. Arsenal 64 

Trinidad Jr. College 59 



Northeastern 


71 


Northeastern 


66 


Adams State 


68 


Colo. St. Univ. 


62 


Colorado Mines 


55 


Greely 


61 


A.F.A. Frosh 


55 


Colo. St. College 


43 


Colorado Mines 


47 


Adams State 


56 


Trinidad Jr. College 


69 


Colo. St. Univ. 


64 



Page 219 




Tom Hitzelberger strains to recover the rebound, but his opponent seems 
to have this one in full possession in the heated action beneath the boards. 



On an ovemighter to Northeastern Junior College 
for the next skirmishes the Jayvees took one victory 
but dropped the second game for their third and final 
loss of the season. After this it was a string of ten 
straight wins for the Jayvees with Adams State as 
their first victim. In this one Williams dropped in 
twenty-seven for his season high with Captain Jerrv 
Smith contributing fourteen. 

In the Denver Auditorium on their next outing, 
Bill Kelly starred to lead the baby Rangers over 
Colorado State University with twenty points. Next 
it was Dick Hoogerwerf's turn to take command as 
he grabbed the game scoring high for the season with 
thirty points at Colorado Mines. 

After a quick victory at Greely the Jayvees re- 
turned to Denver to face the Air Force Academy 
Frosh. This game proved to be one of the toughest 
of the season, and it was only the sparkling backcourt 
play and jump shooting of Jerry Tellez which eked 
out the one point victory. This was the last game of 
the year in which the Rangers were faced with any 
real threat as they handily nailed up the next five 
victories. 

Considering such a successful season, it is no sur- 
prise that the varsity was so strongly complemented 
throughout the year nor that Ranger fans are already 
anticipating a top-notch varsity next year. 








"Rabid" Regis fans scream for a freeze during die final seconds of the 
Jayvee-A.F.A. Frosh game which saw Junior Rangers preserve a scant 
one-point lead for the victory. 



High-scoring Ken Williams was die Jayvee 
stalwart in every game and turned in several 
highly-creditable performances for die varsity. 



Page 220 




Leaping to score in enemy territory, Guard Gary De 
Marlie was always a leader of the Jayvees in their early 
season success and soon qualified for a permanent posi- 
tion on the Varsity squad. Such rapid progress and 
development of the Jayvee players was not uncommon 
under the expert guidance of Coach Joe Hall. 



Page 221 



varsity baseball 

ranger nine suffers through 
heartbreaking season. 



The Ranger diamond-nine had a rough season in 
1958 finishing with a 9-4 record that belies the true 
potential of the team. Sparking Regis on the mound 
during the season was pitcher Larry Delmargo who 
later joined the New York Yankees. 

Herb Millard batted a robust .355 to lead the 
batting aggregation. He shared the honors with John 
McCoy, and Frank Blatter who finished with .345 and 
.327 respectively. 

The heartbreak game of the season was the 8-7 
loss to Colorado College which was typical of the 
many close but losing games the team played. The 
encouraging fact was the close score of the losers 
which tends to indicate the strength of the returning 
team which will be composed of veterans. 





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Catcher Vince Cerrone sprints after batter to cover throw to first 
base during game with Colorado College. 



VARSITY BASEBALL— Front Row: Gary Buckley, John Brubaugh, Don Cordova, Vince Cerrone, Ken Rosimarick, Ken Blick. Second Row: Joe Markey, Frank 
Blatter, Pete McLaughlin, Dennis Seitz, Coach Harvey Moore. Back Row: John McCoy, Herb Millard, Jerr Smith, Jim Butler, Larry DelMargo, Mike Christo- 
pher, Steve DePalo. 




Page 222 




Page 223 



golf team 

strong new members 
replace graduation loss 



A fine crop of new faces posed a looming threat 
to the traditional regional foes of the Ranger golf 
team. The 1958 graduation had reduced the ranks 
through the loss of four of the previous year's letter- 
men, but the gap was capably filled by freshmen 
talent. 

Intra-mural matches saw mid-summer form dis- 
played by Bill Cochran, a St. Louis freshman, and 
Johnnie Williams, Denver junior, neither of whom had 
seen action last season. Returning to Regis after a 
brief stay at Bradley University, Tim Davidson, Peoria 
senior, added immeasurable help to the squad, while 
Larry Nau, Mike Williams, Dick Lay, and Harold 
Marcottee all worked overtime in achieving a berth 
on the team. On the tried form of Ray Meyer, only 
returning letterman from last vear, rested much of the 
college's hopes. Completing his senior year with the 
Ranger "tee-men," Ray's outstanding performance on 
the links proved how well founded were the school's 
hopes. 

The team had its work cut out for it in meeting such 
Rocky Mountain golf powers as the Air Force Acad- 
emy, Colorado College and the University of Wyo- 
ming. But under the vigilant eye of Coach Ted Hart 
they brought their game to the high polish required 




Golfer John Williams concentrates on putting as other members 
of the foursome stand silently watching. 




The varsity golf team lounges on the tee waiting their turn to drive. 




Tom Connelly shoots out of sand trap during a 
practice round. 



Page 224 




Bill Cochran shoots an iron shot from 
the fairway. 











Members of a golf foursome wait as 
a member shoots on Case Golf Course. 



Frank Dalpes assumes correct golfing 
stance. 



Page 225 



ski team 

team devotes season to 
rebuilding -program 

Practice sessions and inter-collegiate meets were 
the activities for the members of the ski team. Crip- 
pled by the departure of several lettermen through 
graduation the ski team focused its attention on the 
hopes for next season by developing the truly fine 
potential which the team possess. Mike Wanebo, team 
captain and top point man, was forced to carry much 
of the load and responsibility connected with the jobs 
of captain, coach, trainer, and equipment repairman. 

Three freshmen, Tom Constantine, Geza Kmetty, 
and Bob O'Donnell showed much potential for future 
competition as they established themselves as fine 
racers in downhill and slalom competition. Sopho- 
more Bill Jordon and senior Mike Wilson showed en- 
durance and spirit in their roles as cross-country skiers. 
Jumpers Bohn Herrick and Bick Dutton proved them- 
selves as consistent, top-point winners in jumping 
events. 

The future looks especially promising because of 
the devotion and desire shown during the season. 





Exceeding speeds of sixty miles an hour, one of the Regis 
skiers is a picture of determination and fear. 



Pleasure skiing always takes place before and 
after the races. Here Bill Dutton, Tom Con- 
stantine, Mike Wanebo, and Ralph Russ ad- 
mire the powder snow. 




Finishing a cross country race, Mike Wanebo shows 
that look of exhaustion. 



Page 226 




Outstanding skier and jumper, Rohn Herrick, executes a fifteen 
point jump at one of the inter-collegiate ski meets held at Winter 
Park, Denver's public ski area. 




•% 



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A pre-requisite for jumping is concerned with 
checking and rechecking the run to cut down 
the risk, which is entailed in this sport. Here 
the judges pause for the contestant. 



I m 





Making a necessary gate while racing in an inter-col- 
legiate meet is Tom Constantine. 



Page 227 



bowling 

first year of organhed 
bowling complete success 



This year Regis added another sport to its list of 
extra-curriculars . . . intramural bowling. The league 
was organized and guided by Father W. J. Steiner, 
S. J., one of the most avid bowlers on campus. Sixteen 
teams were formed and bowled according to the rules 
and regulations established by the American Bowling 
Congress. This handicapping system gives a more-or- 
less equal chance of winning: necessary because of 
the varying degrees of proficiency exhibited by the 
competing teams. 

Both high series and high game were rolled by 
Father Houser S. J., with a 634 and a 252 respectively. 
Other consistent high scorers were Tom Landauer, 
Dennis Starbuck, Joe Bonsignore, Rich Lohman, and 
Dick Lay. 

Midway through the season, at Father Steiner's 
departure from Regis for another assignment, Father 
Kelly, S. J. took over as moderator. 

Regis' first season of organized bowling was a 
complete success, and all students are looking forward 
to another year of "pin action." 



Regis students turned out in strong numbers for bowling practice 
in the intramural league which was established this year. The 
league turned out to be the most widely accepted intramural 
sport on campus. 




Bowling endiusiast Peter Swanson bites lip in determination 
as he hurls tbe ball in hope of scoring a strike to raise his 
average. 





Aij afternoon of pure relaxation complemented with friendly competition 
is perhaps the biggest attraction that the sport of bowling offers, and die 
mentally-fatigued students took full advantage of this weekly event. 



Even calm and collected Tom Tracy 
can be slightly disconcerted by a 
"gutter ball" after a strike. 







■:■ 




intramural football 

During the fall as thoughts turned to football the 
intramural program began and the afternoon battles 
caused their usual interest as five teams competed for 
the highly coveted Intramural Football trophy. 

The five competing teams were the Slicks, Chi-Los, 
Weird Ones, Animals and Bombers. 

Last year tire Grenadiers won the title by soundly 
beating Mo's Boys but this year with, new powerful 
teams entering the field it appeared as though any 
team could capture the trophy. 

The season moved to its close and at the end two 
teams were deadlocked for the top spot with identical 
7-1 records. 

In the play-off the Weird Ones faced the Animals 
for the school intramural championship. 

The Animals, who had been the only team to de- 
feat the champions during the season, were unable 
to put together a scoring drive. The Weird Ones 
proved more than equal to the occasion when their 
goal line was threatened. Thus ended the Animal's 
dream of becoming the first freshman team in recent 
years to bring home the trophy. 

The only other team to defeat the second place 
Animals was the third place Chi Los and it ranked as 
the biggest upset victory of the season. 

The season closed on a note of well-played, close 
games and with tire thought that in the future the 
teams would be more evenly matched and driven on 
by the strong desires born during tills season. 

As tlie snap from center goes to the waiting back a play 
begins in the championship game between the Animals 
and Weird Ones. 




Although the game is supposedly touch foot- 
ball many people would be willing to argue 
die point. 




Page 230 




intramural softball 

The early fall and the coming of the spring days 
causes scholars to turn from their books and wander 
over to the baseball field for a game of softball in 
the summer-like afternoons. 

Fine pitching from junior champion Mel LaBelle, 
the acknowledged master- of the college mound, and 
power hitting from the bat of junior Jim Wetzel make 
an interesting game. 

The teams are drawn along class lines with the 
juniors holding the edge in both departments of hit- 
ting and pitching while the seniors, because they are 
seniors, tend to take the game in a less serious vein. 
The antithesis of them are the freshmen, intent on 
making a name for themselves, so they play with a 
grim and fierce determination. 

The softball games played on the college baseball 
fields are merely preparation for the really big games 
played at Berkley Lake when teams are pitted against 
one another in grim earnest for liquid prizes. Those 
are the games. 



Ahead of the ball, Jerry Tellez hits the dirt at 
third base to beat the catcher's throw and earn 
a stolen base. 



Freshman Tom Copps checks the 
batting lineup with score-keeper Roger 
Mullaney during a close game. 




Pat Klein attempts to make first base 
after hitting a short one to the pitcher. 



Page 231 



intramural 

basketball 



attracts seventeen teams 

With seventeen teams enthusiastically hailing the 
introduction of the intramural basketball season there 
was definitely no lull in spirit at the close of the foot- 
ball schedule. But although the ball was round, not 
oblong, and the scene on hardwood rather than on 
snow-covered tliistles, a familiar name was again at 
the top of the I. M. standings. 

The Weird Ones, with practically their whole grid 
squad intact, rolled through their first encounters un- 
defeated for an early tie for first place. But nothing 
is to be denied their counterparts, the Argos who also 
annihilated their first-round opponents. Behind the 
accuracy of Hibbison, Dunn, and Mueller, the Argos 
ran mercilessly over the 1958 champion ADG team 
and then pared the strong Moscow Mules from the 
ranks of the unbeaten. 

In the tournament then it was the experienced 
Weird Ones against the well-conditioned Argos. Both 
teams showed championship form, the Weird Ones be- 
hind Dick Barteau and Paid Dugan and the Argos 
behind Mueller and Hibbison; but in the final analysis 
it seemed to be the conditioning which paid off 
as the Argos took the 1959 championship. 



High-flight action finds Gene Mueller far above 
the congregation waiting for the rebound. 





Varsity form is exhibited by Chris O'Donnell whose 
deadly accuracy is a consistent threat to any opponent, 
but two A D G's close in just in case. 

Leaps and kicks lend a ballet-like at- 
mosphere as John McCoy strains to 
retain possession of the ball. 





Even team-mates fight in the wild melee for the all-important rebounds. 



Mike Dunn and Bill Meiers double-team opponent Lee Pelligreen 
under the basket in the typical struggle for position following 
every shot. 



With flailing hands and closed eyes Jim Taylor and team-mate 
lunge for the elusive ball, but is seems to favor more conservative 
Gary Dougherty. 




fencing 

well-known old world sport 
established at regis 

The newest arrival on the Regis sports' scene this 
year was the founding of a fencing class. In the 
middle of September a group of about twenty stu- 
dents, most of them freshmen, began learning the 
correct postures and lunges of this intricate sport. 
Under tire aegis of Coach Don Drumheller of the 
Denver Fencing Club, the group advanced in the 
techniques of the sport and soon named Geza Kmetty, 
freshman, as their president. 

Kmetty was the most experienced member of the 
fencing club. He had been the junior champion of 
his native Hungiy, where fencing is regarded as a 
national sport. Geza spent the first 16 years of his 
life in his native Budapest, and comments that every 
15th or 20th high school student knew how to fence 
expertly from the time he was 15 years old. Currently 
the Hungarian team is the holder of the Olympic 
championship. 

The freshmen who engaged in this activity were 
granted credit for physical education class, a required 
course for all college students. They were expertly 
drilled in the correct usage of the instruments of 
fencing, die epee and the foil. 

To visit the Regis gym on a wintry Thursday eve- 
ning one might have thought that today's college stu- 
dents were learning the fine art of ballet, but is was 
only Geza's fencing team drilling for competition they 
would soon undertake. 




Under the expert guidance of their instructor, freshmen 
Bill Graefe and Bill Freschi quickly learn the fine points 
of the art of fencing. 



Balance and concentration on the opponent's tactics appear to 
be die prime requisites for a successful parry and dirust. 




*****, 




FENCING CLUB MEMBERS-left to Right: George Reid, Bill Graefe, Bill Freschi, Doug 
Kent, Geza Kmetty, Dick Buchmiller, Herb Brentlinger. 



Regis fencing enthusiasts pair off against each other in an after- 
noon of practice trying to develop the graceful co-ordination 
necessary for future competition. 



Following the instructions of Instructor Kmetty, Bill Freschi 
climaxes a rapid parry with a score against his opponent as 
through die gym die cry rings "Touche Monsieur Pussycat." 





1959 

REGIS 
RANGER 



Page 236 



A 




V 

E 




T 
I 
S 

I 




G 



Page 237 




tt 



SACRED HEART" 



This page made possible through the courtesy of 

WILFRED G. EYRE 



Page 238 




PRODUCT MANUFACTURING DIVISION 

ALMA PISTON 

COMPANY 



ALMA, 



MICHIGAN 




CONTRACT MANUFACTURERS - 
AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND ASSSEMBLIES 



CONGRATULATIONS 

CLASS 

OF 

1959 




Page 239 




^y^U^'^ 




LOWELL DRUGS 

RAY & MAXINE CAIN 

4901 Lowell Blvd. 
The Record Shop Of Distinction 

Harmony Record Shop 

1511 Welton Street 

Everything in Recorded Music 

CH erry 4-2827 
Denver 2, Colorado 

DENVER GOLF 

AND TENNIS 

1807 WELTON STREET 
DENVER, COLORADO 



Champagne Quality 




RENTAL 
and 
SALE 

27 styles 
18 coat colors 
89 Cummerbund 
patterns 



RANDALL'S 

1611 Glenarm AM 6-0608 

(near Paramount Theater) 

2241 So. Broadway RA 2-0608 



Meet Your Friends 

at the 

BELMONT STAG BAR 




304 17th Street 
"Across From The Brown" 



Page 240 



*eu>e0uf 



OF HIGHEST QUALITY 



WILLIAM CROW 

JEWELER 

Established 1924 
Diamonds . Watches . Silverware . Jewelry 



\\l// 






Ring Designing and Remounting 
Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Third Floor, University Bldg. 

910 16th Street Ke. 4-6336 

Denver 2, Colorado 




Save Time Laundryette 

with student rates 

Clothes washed, fluff dry and folded 

Dry cleaning — Shirt finishing 

4224 Tennyson St. 

Phone GR 7-0631 



Dress Properly 
For Special Affairs 

WE RENT DRESS SUITS 

for 

PROMS WEDDINGS 

FORMAL EVENTS 

Complete Line of Accessories 

C. B. GILLILAND %. CO. 

Formal Wear — Sales, Rentals 

1029 17th St. KE 4-3585 

Denver, Colorado 



Page 241 



1 



.-"-■»■ ..-'■-"'.;--. -J- - -; ■'"-_,- — . 



■'fP'-BIHP 



Congratulations to 
THE CLASS OF 1959 



iU»Xd»*»A*tiilii 




'SOTT^r.':-.; 



liRIMTH 1111$. II. 



2770 North Speer Boulevard 
Denver 11, Colorado GRand 7-3313 




Compliments 
of 

CROWN LANES 

Sooth Federal Blvd. 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

LEHRER'S FLOWERS 

3301 West 38th 

Denver, Colorado 

GRand 7-1688 



Compliments 
of 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK 

CHARLES B. McCORMICK Jr. 

GRACE M. McCORMICK 



Page 242 




Compliments of LORETTO HEIGHTS STUDENT BODY 



DERNEHL-TAYLOR 
COMPANY 

Institutional Wholesale 
Grocer 

326 N. Water Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



murphy-mahoney Chevrolet 
no. speer at federal 



Compliments 
of 

Mr. Jack McLaughlin 
COTTRELl/S 



GE 3-6241 



Page 243 



BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE 



^ liljll I 

1 1 y j s s . • i 



■ 9" ! ' I" ■ 

! gfe II f ! < 

a a ■-, - " » « i i i 
SSI iff! 



Mi 



I ! I nffft 

HffFffff 



i Ui i 







Bankers Union Life's new Home Office Building 
in Denver's Cherry Creek Business Center. 



Now in our 29th year 



SELECT TERRITORY 



Capital and Surplus 
over $2,400,000 



California-Colorado-Idaho 



Kansas-Nebraska-Nevada 



Over $1 16 in Assets 

to every $100 in Liabilities 



New Mexico-Oregon 



Over $55,000,000 Insurance in force 



South Dakota-Texas 



Washington-Wyoming 



An Old-Line, Legal-Reserve Company — 
writing both participating and 
non-participating plans 



Top first year and vested renewal Commissions 
available for qualified Agents and General Agents 



We salute another great Denver Institution — Regis College! 

Graduates are invited to talk with us on splendid opportunities 
with our organization. 

BANKERS UNION LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

C. B. McCORMICK, PRESIDENT 
Denver Colorado 



Page 244 




#•■■■ 






i 







;': ■'':' 






m 




^,^-A 



<»m. 



PKOPOStD ;i£LD UOUSt PIS COLLtCt 



FIRST FLOOR PLAN 



FIRST FLOOR JSflOJioi 

SECOND FLOOR 6,000 t« " 



>X>^ 





Compliments 

of 

A. A. McCue 

Mr. & Mrs. Al Gottschalk 

Chenia A. Abegg 

Downs Supply Co. 

Charles J. Galli 

Jack's Barber Shop 

Mrs. Marie A. O'Neill 



ROLAND M. JOHNSON • ARCHITECT • A.I.A. 



Page 245 




Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. O'Connor 



Page 246 




GOOD LUCK 
REGIS MEN 



Remember for the finest in 
food and drink; where 
Regis men Meet. 



Banquet room available 
to Regis Men. 



ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 



Vz block off Federal on 44th 




AUTO ACCESSORIES - WASHING - LUBRICATION 
PICK UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE 




ASHKER'S 



4890 Lowell Blvd. 
DENVER, COLORADO 

JOSEPH R. ASHKER, PROP. 



SERVICE 



GL. 5-7529 



Page 247 



Quick and Dependable 
Service see 



NELSON'S 



CONOCO 



STATION 



4900 Lowell Blvd. Denver, Colo. 

GR 7-9960 



Compliments of 
BEN & KAY'S 

4305 Yates Street 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

MOUNTAIRE FARMS, INC. 

( Successors to Maplecrest Farms 
of Colo., Inc.) 

1410 Cottonwood Street 
Denver 4, Colorado 

"The Finest Poultry Products" 



THE LAUNDRY CHUTE 
39th & Tennyson 

1 Day Service 

Shirts Fluff Dry 

Dry Cleaning 



senior 
directory 



JOSEPH ADDUCCI 
4826 Alcott Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES BABKA 
23 Ann Avenue 
Valley Park, Missouri 

CHARLES T. BASTIEN 
787 Josephine Street 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT G. BERGKAMP 

509 10th 

Garden City, Kansas 

HENRY C. BLUM 
5100 Perry Street 
Denver, Colorado 

PHILIP BOBERSCHMIDT 
23 S. Allen Street 
Madison 5, Wisconsin 

JOSEPH J. BOYLE 
2497 Pierce Street 
Denver, Colorado 

LAWRENCE E. BRADY 
9300 Nagel Drive-Thornton 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT G. BUCKLEY 
850 So. Harrison 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES P. BUTLER 
5858 N. Louise Avenue 
Cripple Creek, Colorado 

LEIGH W. CALLENDER 
417 Park 
Sterling, Colorado 

EUGENE C. CAVLIERE 
4760 Alcott Street 
Denver, Colorado 

CARL L. CECCHINE 
4050 Clay Street 
Denver, Colorado 

VINCENT P. CERRONE 
4243 Harlan-Wheatridge 
Denver, Colorado 



Page 248 



JAMES W. CREAMER 
655 Locust Street 
Denver, Colorado 

WILLIAM A. CRESPIN 
1350 Lipan Street 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS E. CROAK 
2814 North Parker 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

JOSEPH G. CULLEN 
204 W. Fourth Avenue 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 

JOSEPH W. CULIG 
1526 Berkley 
Pueblo, Colorado 

RICHARD T. CUMMINGS 
1 1 Frederick Lane 
Glendale, Missouri 

THOMAS K. DEAN 
9160 Vasel Drive 
St. Louis 23, Missouri 

FRANK J. DEGENHART 
3527 W. 44th Avenue 
Atwood, Colorado 

TOM DeROCHIE 
1005 Lynch Place 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

FRANCIS M. DIERKS 

739 Quapaw 

Hot Springs, Arkansas 

LEONARD J. DILISIO 
11 10 So. 6th 
Raton, New Mexico 

PAUL E. DOYLE 
761 So. Umatilla 
Denver, Colorado 

VINCE M. DWYER 
650 Birch 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT V. ELDREDGE 
1133 Race Street 
Denver, Colorado 

EDWARD E. ELLIOTT 
653 York Street 
Denver, Colorado 

KENNETH J. ESPINOSA 
831 South Cascade 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 

JOHN F. EVANS 
5700 N. W. 36th Street 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

DONALD J. FISHER 
3570 Ivanhoe Street 
Denver, Colorado 

DANIEL FRANK 
291 1 Bellaire Street 
Denver, Colorado 



v.:m $ "Y~*~~- 




WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

3 — Barbers — 3 

Best Service Before 3 P. M. 

ALL STYLES 

Shines on Saturdays 

HOURS 

8 A.M. to 6 P.M. 

Tuesday Through Saturday 

5032 Federal Blvd. 



JACK AND TEENEY'S 
BAR AND GRILL 

Best in Food & Drink 
Free Popcorn 

Known to Regis Men 
as 

//c :_!-.// 



'Sunnyside' 



4407 West 52nd Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 



KORN'S 
Men Shop 



"Specializing in clothing and 
sports wear for young men" 



503 16th Street 
Denver, Colorado 



Page 249 



Compliments 
of 

JEFFERSON TYPEWRITER 

BE. 7-2687 

5301 West Colfax 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

LINDAHL'S 

1637 Court Place 
Denver, Colorado 




LEUTHY'S KITCHEN 

5004 N. Federal Blvd. 

Good Food Pleasant Atmosphere 

Home Made Pies & Pastiy 

Open From 7 a.m. To 8 p.m. 

Closed Sunday 



CHARLES FUERMANN 
2091 Eudora Street 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT J. GOETZ 

3940 So. Acoma-Englewood 

Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS M. GRIGGIN 
3018 AlisoDr., N. E. 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

CLEMENT HACKETHAL 
8012 W. 12th Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES F. HOFSETZ 
545 Yates Street 
Denver, Colorado 

STEVE B. HUMANN 
3293 Ivanhoe 
Denver, Colorado 

KENNETH KARR 
11200 So. Washtenaw 
Chicago 43, Illinois 

JAMES D. KEENAN 
7410 N. Range Pine Road 
Milwaukee 9, Wisconsin 

RICHARD KELLY 
1 57 6th Avenue 
Durango, Colorado 

MICHAEL H. KENNEDY 
19 Thorndell Drive 
Richmond Heights, Missouri 

WILLIAM C. KIEFER 

R. R. #3 

Grand Junction, Colorado 

GERALD KILPATRICK 

1409 Gilpin 
Denver, Colorado 

STEVE W. KOVACIK 

1410 Popular Street 
Denver, Colorado 

ROBERT D. LALICH 
2640 Xavier Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN K. LANDAKER 
8635 W. Colfax Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 

KENNETH W. LANE 
1 349 Clermont Street 
Denver, Colorado 

GERALD A. LAWLESS 
960 Pearl Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN F. LINDEMAN 
7101 Westmoreland 
University City, Missouri 



Page 250 



ROBERT LINNENBERGER 
1107 Wabash Street 
Denver, Colorado 

charles j. McCarthy 

Box 345 

Taos, New Mexico 

REGIS P. MALLOY 

409 Morningside Dr., S. E. 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

VINCENT A. MANGUS 
500 Spruce Street 
Louisville, Colorado 

HOWARD MARSHALL 
1360 Humboldt Street 
Denver, Colorado 

ELEUTERIO J. MARTINEZ 
1023 West Houghton 
Santa Fe, New Mexico 

MANUEL A. MARTINEZ 
1601 Jay Street 
Santa Fe, New Mexico 

WILLIAM H. MEIERS 
721 No. 3rd 
Arkansas City, Kansas 

ROBERT J. MILLER 
4219 Shoshone Street 
Denver, Colorado 

DAVID R. MOFFITT 
Route #1, Box 100 
Derby, Colorado 

JAMES J. MOLCHAN 
2213 W. Aiken Avenue 
Peoria, Illinois 

PATRICK G. MORAN 
1002 E. 17th Avenue 
Denver, Colorado 

GEORGE G. MOSSBRUCKER 
3530 Eloit Apt. #4 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN W. MUDD 
1288 So. Sherman 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN A. MULLANE 
2930 Quitman Street 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS A. MURPHY 

1017 W.Hill 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

MATHEW L. NICKELS 
R. R. #3, Box 339 
Aurora, Illinois 

EMMETT M. O'BRIEN 

5649 Terry 

St. Louis 20, Missouri 



STYLES FO| MEN 



m 

A 



L 



P 



E 



R 



T 



Denver's only 
Playboy store 

16th at Glenarm Sts. 



PLAYBOY 




III 



Compliments 
of 

'BOOTS" 
TEXACO SERVICE 

GL 5-9808 

4990 Federal Blvd. 

Denver, Colorado 



l 



h^ 






KWf BATTERIES MttClVLJ 




MERKL'S SERVICE 
STATION 

4437 West 38th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 



Page 251 









j r I^sST"- ""' 


1 V 


K^^ 




^fl 


Ik) I 1 

1 




— gftlBlO 


bS^" 




* "^^ ~?si 




I« 






i.'iiKf^Sffl 



RITE-LITE SUPPLY 
Denver, Colorado 



A & J DRIVE INN 

Place your Order By Phone 

GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN & SHRIMPS 
BURGERS — FOOTLONGS 



1996 S. Federal Blvd. 



WEst 4-8494 



SAM'S RADIO & 
PHONOGRAPH 

Your Motorola Dealer 
In This Area 

4974 Lowell Blvd. GL. 5-0744 

Denver, Colorado 



JAMES E. O'CONNOR 
2684 Fairfax Street 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN M. O'HARA 
3049 S. Superior Street 
Milwaukee 7, Wisconsin 

JOHN R. O'ROURKE 
2842 E. 35th Street 
Tulsa 5, Oklahoma 

JOHN E. OWENS 
915 Teller 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS J. PADE 
4753 Cody 
Denver, Colorado 

GERALD R. PAXTON 
11 50 So. St. Paul 
Denver, Colorado 

THOMAS H. PEPIN 
1040 Clayton 
Denver, Colorado 

VIC A. PERRELLA 
3710 Zuni Street 
Denver, Colorado 

BERNARD E. PETERS 
2427 Grove Street 
Denver, Colorado 

EDWARD J. POWERS 
412 Selbourne Road 
Riverside, Illinois 

RAYMOND C. REDDICK 
1300 Monaco 
Denver, Colorado 

TOM J. REGAN 
907 7th Street 
Garden City, Kansas 

ROBERT G. REHAN 
11 26 So. Paxton 
Sioux City, Iowa 

THOMAS C. ROONEY 
11803 E. Colfax-Aurora 
Denver, Colorado 

LOUIS C. ROTTER 
18 Ellsworth Lane 
St. Louis, Missouri 

RALPH A. RUSS 
1743 So. Marion 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES A. RYAN 
9330 S. Laflin 
Chicago 20, Illinois 

LAWRENCE F. SCHEETZ 
4366 Vrain Street 
Denver. Colorado 



Page 252 



DONALD L. SCHMITZ 
1280 Eudora 
Denver, Colorado 

RAY F. SCHNERINGER 
3030 W. 38th Ave. 
Denver, Colorado 

PETER A. SCHWAB 
1756W. MosierPl. 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN F. SHAY 
1525 Filbert Ct. 
Denver, Colorado 

JOHN G. SHEA 
3530 Milwaukee 
Denver, Colorado 

TERRENCE C. SHEEHY 
905 N. 6th Street 
Garden City, Kansas 

RALPH J. SPEAR 
3930 Utica 
Denver, Colorado 

DANIEL A. SPENSIERI 
306 Genesee Street 
Lafayette, Colorado 

LAWRENCE J. SPRINGER 
2480 So. Monroe 
Denver, Colorado 

JOSEPH H. SULLIVAN 
215 So. 4th Street 
Douglas, Wyoming 

ROGER L. SWEENEY 
4542 Cook Street 
Denver, Colorado 

RICHARD A. THEISEN 
1649 Madison Street 
Denver, Colorado 

WALTER R. VALDEZ 
914 Clay Way 
Denver, Colorado 

JEAN C. WALKER 
1 127 Weeden Manor 
Huntsville, Alabama 

CLIFFORD K. WANEBO 
3321 W. Clyde Place 
Denver, Colorado 

JAMES WEBER 
434 So. Clarkson 
Denver, Colorado 

MICHAEL K. WILSON 
731 S. Ninth 
Salina, Kansas 

BERT ZUMTOBEL 
4480 Vrain Street 
Denver, Colorado 




GUY'S SERVICE STATION 

Frontier Gas & Oil — Pennz Oil 
Tires, Tubes And Accessories 

GL. 5-5725 

4991 Federal Blvd. 

Denver, Colorado 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 



FREEMAN 



Shoes for Men 




Page 253 







PROTEIN WHEAT — Bread like great grandmother made. A teaspoonful of natural 
wheat germ in every slice. No sugar 44 calories per ounce slice. 

SOYA WHEAT — Where regular bread supplies 20% starch, this makes available only 
9%. Rich golden color. No sugar. 



Compliments 
of 

OTTO DRUG 

5070 Federal Blvd. 

Serving North Denver Since 1924 
Fountain Service 



Gl. 5-6139 



Gl. 5-9850 



HICKS-DENVER COMPANY 



Manufacturers of Brushes, Street and Road 
Brooms; also a complete line of Cleaning 
Supplies. 



1235 Stout 
Denver, Colorado 



Compliments 
of 

VALLEY DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY 

Albuquerque, New Mexico 




VITALE'S MUSIC STUDIO 

5040 Federal Blvd. 



15% Discount on Albums to 
Regis Students 



Phonographs, Radios, Records 



Page 254 




«■«•&» &&"_ 



7beer to so aas 




*ii£jfc**wi^- 



^J 





Let's go DANCING at 

KIT'S Kill; M It 

4620 East Colfax 
Between Cherry and Dexter 




CLARENCE CROSS 
CHARLES J. NAU 
COMPANY, INC. 



CROSS AND NAU 

Company 

221 NORTH LASALLE STREET 
CHICAGO 1, ILLINOIS ANDOVER 3-1425 



GENERAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE 
AND MASONRY REPAIRS 



WATERPROOFING * TUCK POINTING * CORNICE REMOVAL * BUILDING CLEANING 



Page 255 




DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED FOR T 




NORTH NEVADA AVENUE . COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO . DIAL MEIrose 3-5069 



MORRISON INC. 

Better marketing through Creative Advertising 

Specialist in preparation of 
Catalogs Radio Commercials 

Direct Mail Sales Conventions 

Envelope Stuffers Sales Exhibits 

Market Research Point of Sale 

Outdoor Advertising T V Commercials 

Product Publicity 

Recognized by ANPA— APA— PPA— OAA— NARB 
3800 West Vliet St. • Division 4-4800 • Milwaukee 8, Wis. 



THE SPORTSMAN INN 

featuring 3 D! 

Dine — Dance — Drink 

in 

Fine Fashion 

Lafayette, Colorado 



MARIGOLD CAFE 

Real Italian Food 
Italian Pizza Pie 

BEER -WINE 
MIXED DRINKS 

4100 Tejon Street 
Phone GL. 5-9859 



Page 256 




j&g* 



fa 



T 






IS55SSS SBBT 




The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous 

lllltf BROS. IISTIINTIM CD. 



DICK'S WHOLESALE 

TOBACCO, CANDIES AND NOVELTIES 

R. A. OSTBERG 

SUnset 9-1136 2842 So. Broadway 

ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO 



Page 257 




Congratulations 
to 

THE CUSS OF 1959 

THE FRESHMAN, SOPHOMORE, 
AND JUNIOR CLASSES 



Page 258 




Compliments 

of 

Mr. & Mrs. 

John 

Doherty 

and 

Faculty of 

Regis 

College 



# 



i0 *N fRAN C/ s 




«fi 



<? 



<T 



Page 259 



ili 




Compliments of Jim Caveleri 



Your SUPERIOR Class of 59 



You are convinced your class is all of that — and as you make homes of your own in the years to come, 
you'll be sold on another Superior Class of '59 the over 58 varieties of top quality sausage products bearing 
Superior Brand and Picnic Brand labels. 



Best wishes for your futures 



DENVER WHOLESALE MEAT COMPANY 



2706 West Colfax Ave., Denver 4, Colorado 



Page 260 



"MEMORY" 



It's Queer, The Things You Remember 
When Life Has Crumpled Suddenly 
And Left You Standing There, Alone. 



It's Not The Big, Important Things: 
Not The Plans Of Years Or The 
Hopes You've Worked So Hard For. 



It's The Little Things You Hadn't 
Noticed At The Time: The Way 
A Hand Touched Yours, And You Too 
Busy To Notice; The Hopeful Little 
Inflection Of A Voice You Didn't 
Really Bother To Listen To 

Compliments 
of 

THE O'NEAL'S 



St. Louis 
Mo. 



Page 261 




'THANK YOU FELLOWS" 

THE SINK 



FRYER & STILLMAN, INC 

Colorado 's finest Qrain Jed Cattle 



BEEF SLAUGHTERERS 



5300 Franklin Street 



Denver 16, Colorado 



Page 262 



j • 1 


And o^tLf the. ue&t 


For the 


1 ['REGIS RANGERS" 

i ; 


UKItlNIAL 44th & TENNYSON 

THEATRE ph gb. 7-0171 


FEDERAL mh & FEDERAL 
THEATRE ph gl. 5-5148 


H ° LIDAY 32 nd SCLAV 

THEATRE ph gl. 5-6843 


WESTWOOD 

** W 3333 W. ALAMEDA 

THEATRE ph we. 5-3606 


GOLDEN 

GOLDEN, COLO. 

THEATRE ph cr. 9-3444 


GOTHIC 

w w ENGLEWOOD 

THEATRE ph su. 1-5515 


DITT 

i m,fc 1912 SO. BDWY. ! 

THEATRE ph pe. 3-0134 


SANTA FE 

«m-m^ in ■ t. Wth & SAmA FE 

THEATRE ph ta. 5-5586 


VICTORY 

v iv 1 wi* 1 16th & CURTIS 

THEATRE ph ch. 4-1557 


1 Only *1U Bed 


9*t Motion, Picture ZtUe/Ucusune4ii! 



Page 263 



* * v^ -V. 




Compliments of 



nc 



DENVER CHICAGO 
TRUCKING CO., INC. 



THE ONLY DIRECT COAST-TO-COAST CARRIER 

DUdley 8-4567 



Page 264 





PAUL J. ROSSMILLER 



DONALD H. CULLEN 



PHONE 
GRand 7-4170 



MEMBER 




NATD 



|[ R and C WHOLESALE CO. 

CANDY — GUM — CIGARETTES — TOBACCO — SUNDRIES 
3616 TEJON STREET DENVER 11, COLORADO 



& the Qj 




'^n ba^ 



Easiest By Far 
to Reach By Car 

The Nation's Finest 

Drive-In, Walk-up Bank 

7 to 7 

15th & Arapahoe Sts. Denver 17, Colorado 

Member: Federal Deposit Insurance, Federal Reserve System 




"Check with Central" 



A.L. BANK #%IM O TRU ST CO. 



Page 265 




HEAD OF THE CLASS 

For straight 

A-h-h-h-h-h-h's 

'the sweetest thing on the shelf 




CANE AND MAPLE SYRUP 



VINCENT SYRUP COMPANY 

DENVER, COLORADO 



FEHR'S FLOWERS 

In Cavaleri's Mart 

1948 W. 48th at Tejon 

* 

Smartly Styled Corsages 
GR. 7-2367 



Compliments of 

A GOOD FRIEND AND 

NEIGHBOR TO REGIS 

BILLY'S INN 

We serve the finest in food and drinks 

The corner of 44th and Lowell 
Only 6 blocks from the campus 



MULKINS GARAGE 



Body Work — Painting — Auto Repair 
Accessories 



4949 Lowell 
Jess Mulkins Prop. 
Home: GE 3-4456 Denver, Colo. 

GR 7-6770 



REGAN JEWELRY STORE 

Diamonds — Watches 
China — Crystal 

Garden City, Kansas 



Page 266 



Gcwcyixdulcrfiosti, 



REGIS COLLEGE GRADUATES 



Class of '59 





Wonderful Dobbs House 
Food and Beverages 

Banquet-Party 
Meeting Rooms 

Valley Highway at Speer 
Denver, Colorado 




In all of Denver 
Nothing can compare 

Country Club 

Atmosphere with 

Downtown 

Convenience 




Page 267 





. i. 

EASTWAY INN 


BEST WISHES 

To The Class Of 1959 


BOB COBURN, Your Host 

Beer To Go Every Day 




Including Sundays 


JERRY J. COURSEY, Jr. 


And Holidays 


Connecticut Mutual 


Til Midnight 




Phone SP. 7-9879 




1128 East 6th Ave. 




Denver 18 f Colorado 


JfeMtfDA LANES 


Live Entertainment 
Modern Jazz 


RUSSELL and BABE JONES 




5225 Wadsworth Avenue 


FIRESIDE INN 


Arvada, Colorado 






3737 East Colfax 


HArrison 4-8121 


Denver, Colorado 


Reservations Week Ends 





Page 268 




Compliments 
of 



COU6HLIN & COMPANY 

SECURITY BUILDING • DENVER, COLORADO 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

HEIL 

PACKING 
COMPANY 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 




Page 269 




To the Brothers of ALPHA DELTA GAMMA 

We wish to express our sincere 

gratitude for your cooperative 

and ambitious effort which 

helped to make this 

yearbook possible. 

THE RANGER STAFF 



Page 270 



gP&P!^ 




i 


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COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 



SEIFERT PONTIAC-CADILLAC 
INC. 

PAUL SEIFERT, President 

6300 E.Colfax FRemont 8-4881 

Denver, Colorado 

KING'S COURT LOUNGE 
AND RESTAURANT 

An Oasis Between Regis 
And Loretto Heights 

1000 So. Federal Blvd. 
WEst 4-9688 Denver 



Compliments 
of 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

LORETTO HEIGHTS 

COLLEGE 



Page 271 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 1959 

Welcome to membership in the National Regis Club — 
The official Regis College Alumni Association. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
1958-1959 


Albert E. Zarlengo 
President 


'30 


Andrew J. Martelon 
Vice-President 


'51 


Charles Sillstrop 
Sec. -Treasurer 


'53 


John V. Amato 


'51 


Pat Coffey 


'31 


Tom Conlon 


'53 


John V. Crowe 


'50 


Louis A. Hall 


'49 


Neil A. Heinan 


'50 


Andrew J. Martelon 


'51 


Lynn E. Mote 


'39 


E. Jack Neuman 


'42 


Vincent S. O'Brien 


'51 


Paul L. Schmitz 


'34 


Charles Sillstrop 


'53 


John Yelenich 


'43 


Albert E. Zarlengo 


'30 




Current Membership — over 2,500 Regis College graduates and former students 

Chapters located in: 

Denver, Colorado Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

St. Louis, Missouri Washington, D.C. 

Chicago, Illinois Los Angeles, California 



Page 272 



H. MAPELLI & SONS 

U.S. GOVERNMENT INSPECTED 

MEATS 







* 










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tit ; iil **■■■ 


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$ 


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|J»» wo,*u«« CO 




FAST REFRIGERATED DELIVERY SERVICE WITH THIS MODERN FLEET 

Serving the finest hotels, restaurants and clubs for over fifty years 



1525 Blake Street 
Denver, Colorado 



Phone: TAbpr 5-5311 



Page 273 



advertising index 



A 

A&J DRIVE-IN 252 

C. A. ABEGG 245 

ALMA PISTON COMPANY 239 

ARVADA LANES 268 

ASHKER'S SERVICE 247 

ATOZ AMUSEMENTS INC 263 

B 

BANKERS UNION LIFE INS. CO 244 

BELMONT STAG BAR 240 

BEN&KAY'S 248 

BILLY'S INN 266 

BOOTS TEXACO 251 

C 

CAUGHLIN & COMPANY 269 

JIM CAVELERI 260 

CENTRAL BANK & TRUST CO 265 

CONNECTICUT MUTUAL 268 

CONTINENTAL DENVER 267 

CROSS AND NAU COMPANY 255 

WILLIAM CROW JEWELRY 241 

CROWN LANES 242 

CURDOLAC FOOD COMPANY 254 

D 

DENVER-CHICAGO TRUCKING CO 264 

DENVER GOLF & TENNIS 240 

DENVER WHOLESALE MEAT CO 260 

DERNEHL-TAYLOR CO 243 

DICK'S WHOLESALE 257 

JOHN DOHERTY COMPANY 259 

E 

EASTWAY INN 268 

ERNIE'S SUPPER CLUB 247 

WILFRED G. EYRE 238 

F 

FACULTY REGIS COLLEGE 259 

FEHR'S FLOWERS 266 

FIRESIDE INN 268 

FREEMAN SHOES CORP 253 

FRYER & STILLMAN INC 262 

G 

CHARLES J. GALLI 245 

B. GILLILAND & CO 241 

AL GOTTSCHALK 245 

GRIFFITH MOTORS INC 242 

GUY'S SERVICE 253 

H 

HARMONY RECORD SHOP 240 

HEIL PACKING COMPANY 269 

HICKS-DENVER COMPANY 254 

J 

JACK'S BARBER SHOP 245 

JACK & TEENY'S 249 

JEFFERSON TYPEWRITER 250 



K 

KAT'S KORNER 255 

KING'S COURT 271 

KORNS MEN SHOP 249 

L 

LAUNDRY CHUTE 248 

LAY FURS 256 

LEHRER'S FLOWERS 242 

LEUTHY'S KITCHEN 250 

LINDAHL PHOTO SALES 250 

LORETTO HEIGHTS S.C 271 

LORETTO HEIGHTS S.B 243 

LOWELL DRUG 240 

Mc 

MR. C. B. McCORMICK 242 

A. A. McCUE 245 

jack Mclaughlin 243 

M 

H. MAPELLI & SONS INC 273 

MARIGOLD CAFE 256 

MERKL'S SERVICE 251 

MORRIS ALPERT 251 

MORRISON & COMPANY 256 

MOUNTAIRE FARMS INC 248 

MULKIN'S GARAGE 266 

MURPHY-MAHONEY 243 

MURRAY BROS. DIST. CO 257 

N 

NELSONS CONOCO SERVICE 248 

NEWSFOTO PUBLISHING CO 275 

O 

S. W. O'NEAL 261 

MRS. MARIE O'NEILL 245 

OTTO DRUG 254 

R 

R & C WHOLESALE CO 265 

RANDAHLS 240 

REGIS CLUB 272 

REGAN JEWELRY STORE 266 

RITE-LITE SUPPLY CO 252 

S 

SAM'S RADIO & PHONOGRAPH 252 

SAVE-TIME LAUNDRYETTE 241 

SEIFERT PONTIAC CADILLAC 271 

THE SINK 262 

SPORTSMAN INN 256 

V 

VALLEY DISTRIBUTING CO 254 

VINCENT SYRUP COMPANY 266 

VITALE'S MUSIC STUDIO 254 

W 

WARD'S BARBER SHOP 249 



Page 274 




ElAf 
WW 



PUBLISHING CO 



P A N Y 




ncujsfoio 



» 




Page 275 



PATR 


ONS 


Mrs. D. H. Alders 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Rafael J. Almada 


Navajoa, Sonora, Mexico 


Mr. V. C. Bash 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


Mr. & Mrs. W. B. Bastien 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. A. B. Baumgartner 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. R. A. Berg 


Bridgeport, Nebraska 


Mr. &Mrs. William Blick 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Richard Bocklage 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. C. F. Brisnehan 


Denver, Colorado 


Mrs. Harold J. Bruce 


Theinsville, Wisconsin 


Mrs. A. C. Cabela 


Chappell, Nebraska 


Mr. Fred V. Chiolero 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. S. L. Chojnacki 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Earle M. Cline 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. Robert Cochran 


Normandy, Missouri 


Mr. & Mrs. A. J. Collins 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Cosimi 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. William J. Cowan 


Naperville, Illinois 


Mr. & Mrs. D. A. DeRochie 


Albuquerque, New Mexico 


Mr. & Mrs. H. DeVries, Sr. 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Ray Dietz 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mrs. Steve DiPaolo 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Distel 


Silverton, Colorado 


Mr. Bernard J. Duffy 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Downes, Jr. 


Chicago, Illinois 


Mr. Wilfred G. Eyre 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Figurniak 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. and Mrs. D. J. Fisher 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. Francalancia & Pat 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. Victor Frenchmore 


Trinidad, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. W. J. Freschi, Sr. 


St. Louis, Missouri 


Mr. Roy F. Godfrey 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 


Mr. & Mrs. M. C. Hamaker 


Rockford, Illinois 


Mrs. H. E. Hammerli 


Topeka, Kansas 


Dr. Elmer J. Harrington 


Holyoke, Massachusetts 


Mr. John Hartmeyer 


Muncie, Indiana 


Mr. E. S. Hirsch 


Denver, Colorado 


Dr. & Mrs. L. W. Huppert 


Okmulgee, Oklahoma 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kelly 


Boonton, New Jersey 


Mr. & Mrs. Jeremiah Kelly 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. Vince Kline 


Denver, Colorado 


Mr. & Mrs. L. F. Kosednar 


Milwaukee, Wisconsin 


Mr. & Mrs. Marion Kosmicki 


Alliance, Nebraska 


Mr. & Mrs. Max Kudar 


Jackson, Wyoming 


Mr. J. K. Landaker 


Lakewood. Colorado 



Page 276 



PATRONS 



Mrs. Elizabeth A. LaVigne 

Mr. & Mrs. August Lohman 

Martin C. Malensek, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Edw. S. McClone 

Mr. O. J. McGinnis 

Mr. L. W. Marrin 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul R. Melvyn 

Miss Ann Morrison 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul L. Mullaney 

Mr. E. J. Murphy 

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Nickels 

Dr. &Mrs. J.J. O'Hara 

Mrs. G. A. Osteen 

Dr. & Mrs. Hy C. Pfeff le 

Mr. & Mrs. Alvin B. Peters 

W. S. & M. E. H. Peto 

Mr. D. E. Prohosky 

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Reid 

Mrs. W. M. Roth 

Dr. & Mrs. A. Rottino 

Mr. Nelson J. Ruddy 

Mr. Charles A. Schmitt 

Mr. J. W. Schulte 

Mr. Norman B. Scott 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Seep 

Mr. & Mrs. A. D. Sherman 

Mr. & Mrs. H. S. Sims 

Dr. James Sullivan 

Mrs. R. S. Sweetman 

Mr. W. J. Swirczynski 

Mr. Joseph Tarabino 

Mr. & Mrs. P. Tartaglia 

Mr. Robert F. Taylor 

Mr. & Mrs. J. D. Thorsen 

Mrs. F. J. Tobin 

Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Turner 

Mr. George M. Wallner 

Mr. & Mrs. T. Walrond 

Mrs. James Welsh 

Mr. & Mrs. Meredith Wetzel 

Mr. F. E. Wilkinson 

Mr. M. Wade 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Yacovetta 

Mr. & Mrs. A. F. Yax 

Dr. & Mrs. E. P. Zarlengo 



Creve Coeur, Missouri 
St. Louis, Missouri 
West Al lis, Wisconsin 
New York, New York 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Dalton, Nebraska 
Amarillo, Texas 
Hartland, Wisconsin 
Winnetka, Illinois 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Aurora, Illinois 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Shreveport, Louisiana 
St. Louis, Missuori 
Greendale, Wisconsin 
Englewood, Colorado 
North Platte, Indiana 
Denver, Colorado 
Goodland, Kansas 
Bronx, New York 
Denver, Colorado 
Denver, Colorado 
Casper, Wyoming 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Denver, Colorado 
Hastings, Nebraska 
Denver, Colorado 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 
Trinidad, Colorado 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 
Wilmette, Illinois 
Phoenix, Arizona 
Mitchell, South Dakota 
Hammond, Indiana 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
Clayton, Missouri 
Great Bend, Kansas 
Clayton, Missouri 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Arcadia, California 
Lincoln, Nebraska 
Denver, Colorado 



Page 277 



student 



Able, Tom 
Abrarno, Joseph 
Adams, George W. 
Adduce!, Joseph 
Aguilar, Xavier 
Albert, Don J. 
Albi, Fred A. 
Alders, Donald D. 
Alire, Henry B. 
Alire, Orlando AA. 
Allen, George T. 
Alien, Peter G. 
Allen, William AA. 
Almada, Rafael J. 
Alonzi, Sante G. 
Arbuthnot, Cecelia 
Arvidson, James E. 
Avila, Jesse B. 

B 

Babka, James R. 
Bailey, David C. 
Baker, Homer D. 
Baker, Paul C. 
Bamrick, Michael G. 
Barbich, Michael H. 
Barteau, Richard J. 
Barth, Theodore J. 
Bash, Richard M. 
Bastien, Charles T. 
Ban, Tom H. 
Baumgartner, Robert 
Beaovais, Philip J. 
Beddoes, Morris G. 
Belford, William A. 
Bellairs, Dennis D. 
Bellefeuille, Robert 
Bennett, James D. 
Berg, John W. 
Bergkamp, Robert G. 
Beshoar, Dan J. 
Betka, Michael C. 
Bischofberger, F. F. 
Bisenius, Michael D. 
Blackford, Lawrence 
Blatter, Frank F. 
Blayney, John M. 
Blick, Kenneth W. 
Blum, Henry C. 
Boatright, James F. 
Boberschmidt, Philip 
Bocklage, Vincent P. 



35, 



45, 



Boersig, George R. 

Boersig, Maurice J. 

Boian, Michael R. 

Bonk, Sr. M. Agnes 

Bonsignore, Joseph 

Boone, Dennis W. 208, 210, 21 

Bostwick, Warren W. 

Boyens, Blaine L. 

Boyle, Joseph J. 

Boyle, Thomas E. 



123 
97 

34,83 
123 

53, 59, 123 
123 
123 

83,97 
123 

36, 40, 109 
109 



34, 44, 97 
123 



39, 83 
97, 123 

123 

40. 97 
123 
124 

47, 51, 109 
124 

124 

36, 41, 97 

39, 124 

109 
59, 109 

124 

124 

124 

70,81 

124 

124 

124 

125 

34, 109 

109,222 

125 

42, 97, 222 

39,83 

35,97 

81 

50, 56, 61 , 

125, 160 

109 

110 

no 

125 

2, 213, 215 

125 



Brady, Lawrence E. 


34,69, 70,84, 165 


Brady, William AA. 


97 


Brandner, Sr. AAaria 




Brentl inger, Herbert 


124, 235 


Brewer, Collen 




Brisnehan, James L. 


1 10 


Brown, Charles F. 


125 


Bruce, James F. 


48, 125 


Bruggeman, John J. 


48 


Buchmiller, Richard 


235 


Buckley, Jay K. 




Buckley, Robert G. 


222 


Buckley, William P. 


125 


Budinger, Charles 


50, 125 


Buehler, Brice E. 




Buhr, Joe D. 


49, 126 


Burke, AAichael F. 


36, 98 


Butler, James P. 42,67,80, 181,208, 




209, 210, 213,222 


Butler, Thomas W. 


51, 126 


c 




Cabela, James W. 


110 


Caldwell, William 




Callender, Leigh W. 




Cambria, John M. 


54, 158 


Carbone, Thomas G. 


110 


Caricato, Louis A. 


35,98 


Carlson, Ronald A. 


98 


Carney, Jim J. 


1 10 


Castaneda, Frank C. 




Cavaliere, Eugene C. 


38, 38, 55, 64, 80 


Cawley, Frank P. 




Cecchine, Carl L. 


49 


Cerrone, Vincent P. 


222 



Cheresposy, AAark J. 
Chiolero, Leo A. 
Chojnacki, John S. 
Christensen, Robert 
Christopher, AAichael 
Cinocco, Carmen N. 
Cinocco, Nicholas L. 
Civerolo, John J. 
Clark, James T. 
Clark, Jerry A. 
Clark, William J. 
Clifford, Sr. Bernard 
Cline, Earle AA. 
Clinton, Edward L. 
Cloutman, Anthony 
Cochran, William J. 
Cocozzella, Peter 
Coleman, Keith E. 
Collins, John A. 
Compton, Stephen J. 
Connell, Leo H. 
Connolly Charles T. 
Connelly, Robt. J. 
Connor, Robert T. 
Connors, Joseph AA. 
Constantine, Thomas 
Cook, Robert W. 
Copps, Tom R. 
Corbin, J. Michael 
Cordova, Donald E. 
Cordova, Fred D. 
Cosimi, A. Benedict 
Coughltn, George F. 
Cowan, Donald 
Cowan, Terrill L, 
Cramer, James J. 
Cramer, AAichael A. 
Creamer, James W. 
Crespin, William A. 
Croak, Thomas E. 
Cronin, Patrick L. 
Cullan, David J. 
Cullan, Thomas R. 
Cullen, Joseph G. 
Cutig, Joseph W. 
Cummings, Richard T 
Curran, Tom E. 



Dalla, Charles G. 
Dalpes, Paul O. 
Daly, John T. 
Dargan, William E. 
Daugherty, Roy A. 
Davidson, Thomas A. 
Davis, Wayne 
Davlin, Ronald J. 
Dawson, Barry T. 
Dean, Thomas K. 

Deasy, John F. 
Degenhart, Frank J. 
DeHaas, Peter R. 
DeLaney, John AA. 
DeLeon, John L. 
DelAAargo, Larry J. 
DeAAarlie, Gary P. 
Dennis, Gerald G. 
Denny, Thomas E. 
Denton, John R. 
DeRochie, Tom 
DeVries, James J. 
Diaz, George L. 
Dick, David D. 
Dierks, Francis AA. 
Dietz, Robert R. 
DiLisio, Leonard J. 
Dillon, Donald F. 
Dines, William H. 
Dingman, Bernard J. 
DiPaola, Steve R. 
Distel, Ronald A. 
Dobbs, David C. 
Doherty, Garrett AA. 
Dooher, Terrence E. 
Dowd, Patrick F. 
Downes, James C. 
Downing, Thomas F. 
Doyle, Louis V. 
Doyle, Paul E. 
Dugen, Paul V. 
Duncan, Bernard J. 
Dunn, Donald L. 
Dunn, AAike E. 
Dursey, Anthony AA, 
Dutton, Richard AA. 
Dwyer, Vince AA. 



126 

195 

126 

126 

42, 219, 222 

98 

41, 110 

110 

35, 110 

186, 187 





52, 110, 


194 




59 


, 98 


43, 51 


56, 126, 


225 
49 

126 
34 




98, 


181 




111, 


224 




40, 43, 


126 
126 




41, 59, 


126 
127 


47 


56, 127, 


231 
127 




98, 


222 




39, 


127 


36, 


41,60,71 


,99 




36, 4C 


, 99 



99, 178 



58,64 

38, 47, 50, 68 
127 
127 
99 
39, 50 
34, 34 
181 
111 



127 

36,99 

127 

35, 96, 99 

46, 47, 69, 1 80, 

181, 182, 183 

99 

127 
127 

111, 222 
128, 208, 214 



39, 128 
34, 35 

128 

111 

44, 45, 70 

35, 46, 111 

45 

44, 1 I 1 

57, 128 
222 

111 

111 
99 

128 
128 
128 
35, 45, 46, 50, 100 
59 
111 
100 
128 
111 
112 

40, 128 



Eaton, Robert F. 




128 


Eby, Dave H. 


36, 40, 52, 53, 


100 


Eldredge, Daniel J. 


57, 128, 


158 


Eldredge, Joseph A. 


129, 


158 


Eldredge, Robert V. 






Elliott, Edward E. 






Ellis, Del J. 




129 


Ertel, Quentin G. 


47, 51, 


129 


Espinosa, Gerald D. 




112 


Espinosa, Kenneth J. 






Etzkorn, Robert L. 




34 


Evans, John F. 






Eyre, Richard C. 




100 



36, 4 



Fabry, George J. 
Fagan, AAichael J. 
Falagrady, George 
Farrell, Blair K. 
Fehringer, John R. 
Fickel, Weld H. 
Figurniak, Walter 
Fisher, Donald J. 
Fischer, Robert L. 
Fitzsimmons, Timothy 
Flaherty, AAichael F. 
Fletcher, William S. 
Foley, John B. 
Francalanica, Pat 
Frank, Clem AA. 
Frank, Daniel 
Frei, Al E. 

Frenchmore, Raymond 
Freschi, William J. 
Frey, Paul J. 
Fryen, David A. 
Fuermann, Charles 
Furstenberg, Peter 

G 

Gaglta, Gary L. 
Gahl, James F. 
Gallagher, Dennis J. 

Gallagher, John R. 
GalM, Charles J. 
Galligan, Thomas F. 
Gappa, Richard J. 
Garson, William G. 
Gatschet, Francis J. 
Geary, John C. 
Geerdes, John P. 
Gerstner, Allen 
Getter, Richard K. 
Giles, Robert C 
Gillen, Dennis G. 
Gisler, Henry J. 
Glivar, Robert B. 
Godfrey, James P. 
Goetz, Robert J. 
Golden, William P. 
Gottschalk, Jim C. 
Graefe, William S. 
Grant, Corbert, V. 
Graves, Car! AA. 
Green, George W. 
Gregory, Wm. C. 
Greiten, William 
Griffin, Thomas AA. 
Groene, Delbert L. 
Guyer, James B. 

H 

Hackethat, Clement 
Haley, Michael J. 
Hall, Donald 
Hamaker, John M. 
Hammerli, John 
Hammond, Joseph M. 
Hampton, William J. 
Hanafee, Patrick L. 
Harmer, Thomas H. 
Harrington, Robert J. 
Hartmann, James E. 
Hartmeyer, John W. 
Hasenkamp, John G. 
Hauber, Charles G. 
Hauser, Frank D. 
Haushalter, Jerry L. 
Hawn, Lawrence E. 
Heeren, Ed Leo 
Heil, Richard B. 
Hennessey, John W. 
Henske, Andrew A. 
Herrara, Sr. John Clai 
Hibbison, Craig 
Hill, Gordon A. 
Hilmer, Richard M. 



100 
54 
70,96, 100, 202 
100 
129 
48, 129 

112 

48, 129 

129 

35, 46, 112 

54 



51, 129, 234, 235 
158, 208, 214 



54 

36, 101 

45,52, 53, 108, 

112, 194, 195 

54, 129 

130 

130 

112 

130 

112 

130 

41, 48, 130 

130 

36, 101 

130 

46, 112 

34 

112 
56, 130,234 

53, 130 
130 
131 
101 

56, 131 
34 
113 
101 





101 




131 




131 




45, 113 


44 


47, 113 


46 


61, 113 




59, 101 




131 




33, 100 




131 




131 




32, 182 


,•53 


59, 100 




131 




113 




56, 131 




113 




36, 102 



Hirsch, Donald J. 
Hitzelberger, Thomas 
Hofsetz, James F. 
Hoogerwerf, Richard 
Horan, R. Paul 
Horren, Ted W. 
Hoskins, Daniel T. 
Houston, William B. 
Hudson, Andrew K. 
Hughes, Patrick L. 

Humann, Steve B. 
Humphreys, Harry W. 
Huppert, James J. 
Huppert, Leo W. 

i 

Immordino, Joseph J. 

J 

James, Benny P. 
Jaramillo, James P. 
Jaramillo, John F. 
Jaramillo, Leandro 
Jarboi, James N. 
Jenkins, Charles J. 
Jensen, Thomas E. 
Jiron, Danny G. 
Johnson, Clyde D. 
Johnson, Harold W. 
Johnson, Paul A. 
Jones, James K. 
Jordan, Wilbur F. 
Joule, Kenneth R. 
Joyce, Thomas P. 



K 

Kailing, A. AAichael 
Karr, Kenneth 
Kealey, John K. 
Kearney, James J. 
Keenan, James D. 
Kelly, David J. 
Kelly, Richard 
Kelly, Richard E. 
Kelly, Robert A. 
Kelly, Terrance E. 
Kelly, William H. 
Kennedy, Dennis AA. 
Kennedy, AAichael H. 
Kent, Douglas H. 
Kern, Tom 
Kereszt, Joe 
Kerr, James J. 
Kiefer, William C. 
Kilpatrick, Gerald 
Kimmel, AAark 
King, James C. 
King, Raymond G. 
Kirby, John W. 
Kistner, Joseph AA. 
Klein, Andrew AA 
Klein, Thomas P. 





131 


113, 208, 


214 




35 


132,218, 


219 


38, 40, 48 


108 


113, 


132 


40 


132 




33 


43, 47, 52, 


132. 


194, 


195 




35 




113 



51, 132 

132 

132 

102 

132 
54, 132 

102 

113, 133 

133 

114 

34, 58, 108 



35, 44, 47, 114 

33,49 

133 

102 

56, 133 

39, 44, 45, 57, 59 

70, 102, 156 

38, 133 

133 

133,219 

114 

133, 235 

56 

114 

40, 133 

50, 57, 71 

35 

41,52, 133 

59, 134 

45,50, 114 

102 

32, 43,96, 102, 158 
43, 58,60,70, 134, 
231 



Kmetty, Geza E. 
Kmitch, David P. 
Kmitch, Francis A. 
Koester, John C. 
Koning, T. Michael 
Korte, Sr. M. Angela 
Kosednar, John H. 
Kosednar, Louis J. 
Kosmicki, Patrick W. 
Kovacik, Steve W. 
Kozy, Alexander 
Krier, Duane A. 
Kudar, Max S. 
Kudron, Sr. M. Edward 
Kukar, Tom J. 
Kummet, David N. 
Kuta, Sr. M. Karen 
Kynefte, Harry 

L 

LaBelle, Melvyn J. 
Lalich, Robert D. 
Lammerman, Robert I. 
Lamy, Raymond P. 
Land, Victor E. 
Landaker, John K. 
Landauer, Thomas C. 
Lane, Kenneth W. 
Lane, Lloyd C. 
Langer, Don J. 
LaNoue, Terry K. 
Larkin, Arthur G. 
Lawless, Gerald A. 
Lay, Richard A. 
Learned, Michael J. 
Lederhos, Joseph J. 



134 
114 

35, 114 
114 

114 



134 
134 



36, 59, 96, 102 
114 



134 



53 

134 

52, 134 



134 

135 
135 
135 



Page 278 



inde 



Lennon, Robert A. 






115 


Leon, Arturo 




52 


135 


LeonGuerrero, Jose S. 






103 


Lindeman, James J. 






135 


Lindeman, John F. 


161, 


181 


182 


Linenbrink, Sr. M. Ceci 








Linnebur, Thomas A. 




51, 


115 


Linnenberger, Robert 


42, 


208 


211 


Loehr, William E. 








Lohman, Richard A. 






135 


Long, Gerald R. 








Lopez, Henry C. 






1 15 


Loskouski, Peter L. 






115 


Luchetta, George 






115 


Luepke, Thomas J. 




103 


181 


Luttrell, Thomas L. 








Lynch, John P. Ml 




59 


135 


Lyons, Joseph AA. 






115 


Mc 








McCarthy, Charlie J. 


67, 77 


80, 


160, 



33, 



40, 108, 
45 

54 



AAcCarty, James B 
AAcClung, Clell L. 
AAcCormick, Charles B. 
AAcCormick, James C. 
AAcCormick, Terence J. 
AAcCoy, John L. 33, 42, 43, 59 
AAcCue, Mike A. 
AAcCurdy, William B. 
AAcDaniel, Dennis AA. 
AAcDaniel, Dennis AA. 
AAcGinnis, James AA. 
AAcGlone, Michael W. 
McGowan, Robert E. 
McKnight, Donald E. 
McLaughlin, Peter J. 
McMahan, John C. 
McNeill, Daniel M. 
McNeive, Mike J. 
McNelis, David P. 

M 

MacBlane, Edward J. 
MacDonald, Neil M. 
MacHendrie, Will L. 
Maggio, Frank P. 
Maginn, Francis J. 
Mahli, Maurice 
Mahoney, Hugh A. 
Mahoney, James L. 
Mahoney, Thomas L. 
Maize, Gene F. 
Malensek, John R. 
Maley, Paul A. 
Malloy, Regis P. 39, 



Maltby, William A. 
Mangus, Bill C. 
Mangus, Vincent A. 
Mapelli, Mario J. 
Marcantonio, Randy A. 
Marcotte, Harold D. 
Marin, Feliciano 
Marquez, Sr. M. Rosita 
Marrin, Lawrence W. 
Marshall, Howard 
Martin, Robert M. 
Martinez, Anthony A. 
Martinez, Eleuterio J. 
Martinez, Manuel A. 
Marvel, William M. 
Maschinot, James F. 
May, Gerald W. 
Mayer, Michael F. 
Meiers, William H. 
Meisel, J. Keith 
Meismer, Gerald E. 
Melvyn, P. Dennis 
Meredith, George H. 
Metz, John T. 
Meyer, Ray F. 
Michelli, Tom D. 
Michie, David F. 
Milbert, Roger P. 
Millard, Herb C. 42, 
Miller, George S. 
Miller, Robert J. 
Miller, Rodney E. 
Miller, Warren R. 
Moffitt, David R. 
Molchan, James J. 
Mondragon, Francis X. 
Montez, Anthony B. 
Montoya, Mel R. 
Moore, Patrick 
Moorhead, Louis D. 
Moran, John D. 
Moran, Patrick G. 



177 
57, 135 
135 

35 

135 

1 1 5, 222 

43 

136 

57 

57, 136 

46, 136 

115 



115, 222 
,51, 136 
59, 136 
136 
136 

136 

136 



32, 103, 186 
136 
116 





52, 


137 
137 


39, 46, 60, 66 


80, 




77, 


202 
137 




34, 


103 


35, 41 


54, 


103 

137 




33, 


103 
137 

116 


42, 


208, 


216 




44, 


137 
34 




41 


103 




116 


186 
116 
34 


32,33 


49 


104 
137 

137 

137 


49 


, 61, 


104 




116 


160 

137 


116, 208, 


212 


222 
116 



Moreno, Richard V. 138 

Morgan, Thomas F. 116 

Morrison, Edwin J. 32, 116 
Moschel, Ronald W. 38, 51, 52, 59, 138 
Mossbrucker, George G. 

Muckenthaler, James C. 138 
Muckenthaler, John L. 
Mudd, John W. 

Mueller, Gene L. 35, 39, 45, 104 

Mullane, John A. 138 

Mullaney, Roger P. 56 

Mulqueen, Charles A. 51,54 

Mura, John A. 138 

Murphy, John P. 138 

Murphy, Thomas A. 34 



Nalty, Raymond F. 




104 


Nash, John F. 




138 


Nau, Laurence J. 




56, 139 


Nauser, John A. 






Nickels, Mathew L. 






Normington, Colin T. 




139 


Norris, Garth J. 






Norton, Dennis L. 






Nusse, Rodney L. 




139 


o 






O'Brien, Emmett M. 




33 


O'Brien, Stephen W. 




139 


Obst, James E. 32, 


43,59, 


104, 161 


Ochs, Roland P. 




139 


O'Connell, John R. 




139 


O'Connor, James E. 


43, 60, 70, 76 


O'Connor, James F. 




104 


O'Donnell, Christopher 


43, 44 


60, 108, 
117 


O'Donnell, Robert E. 




47, 139 


O'Grady, Richard J. 




104 


O'Hara, John M. 




45, 56 


O'Hayre, Joseph R. 




139 


O'Hayre, Leonard H. 






O'Keefe, Raymond K. 


46 


, 57, 139 


O'Lear, Bernard T. 




139 


O'Leary, James L. 






O'Meara, Michael J. 






O'Meara, Owen P. 




36, 119 


O'Neal, Pete 43, 48, 50, 56, 57, 61 , 






140, 219 


O'Neill, Patrick H. 


33, 


117, 1 82 


O'Rourke, John R. 




45,61 


Ostberg, Richard H. 




140 


O'Steen, Gordon A. 






Otero, Dan L. 




46, 117 


Owens, John E. 




35 



138 
53 
138 



Pacheco, Donald N. 
Pade, Thomas J. 
Padilla, Eduardo C. 
Patterson, Leon E. 
Patton, Richard A. 
Paulbeck, Ted M. 
Paxton, Gerald R. 
Paxton, James R. 
Pazereskis, John F. 
Pelligreen, Lee B. 
Pepin, Thomas H. 
Perrella, Vic A. 
Perry, Michael K. 
Peters, Bernard E. 
Peters, Greg A. 
Peto, John H. 
Petralia, Louis S. 
Petrillo, Fred R. 
Pfeffle, Robert F. 
Phillips, James R. 
Pilakcwski, Sr. Joan 
Pilkington, Harold D. 
Piper, Bruce W. 
Pipkin, Robert D. 
Pittelkow, Charles R. 
Pittelkow, Richard T. 
Powers, Edward J. 
Primavera, Douglass F. 
Proctor, Edward J. 

Q 

Quinn, Mike H. 
Quinn, William J. 
Quintero, Frank R. 

R 

Rael, Gilbert E. 
Ramsey, Charles A. 
Randolph, John J. 
Ranney, Francis L. 
Ranney, Larry P. 
Rasmussen, John R. 
Rauen, James L. 
Raymond, Douglas H. 



32, 117 

39, 140 

140 

61, 140 

44, 47, 117 

140 
39, 140 
140 
34 
34,66 
140 
56 
140 
141 



141 
54, 104 



117 
40, 71, 117 

117 

56, 141 

65,80, 180 

141 

117 

141 

44, 118 

105 



Reddick, Raymond C. 
Reed, Frederick A. 
Regan, Tom J. 
Rehan, Robert G. 
Reich, Fredric C. 
Reichert, Fred F. 
Reichwetn, Frank V, 
Reid, George E. 
Reinecke, Mark E. 
Rekate, Dana F. 
Remington, Thomas J. 
Rhoades, James T. 
Rice, Gregory P. 
Richmond, Virgil L. 
Rittenberg, Richard E. 
Roach, William W. 
Roatch, Lloyd H. 
Roberston, Robert F. 
Robinson, John A. 
Robison, Michael P. 
Roblee, Michael J. 
Rohlfing, Derrick C. 
Romano, Charles J. 
Romero, Charles J. 
Rooney, Thomas C. 
Roth, Robert J. 
Rotter, Louis C. 
Rottino, David A. 
Rowlan, Sr. M. Bernice 
Rubi, Isidro C. 
Ruddy, Nelson J. 
Russ, Ralph A. 
Ruybal, Alonzo N. 
Ryan, Donald L. 
Ryan, James A. 
Ryan, James P. 
Ryan, Joseph G. 
Ryan, Jude (Postulani) 
Ryan, Patrick M. 
Ryan, Thomas P. 



Salaz, Ernie 
Sandretto, William A 
Santos, Edward L. 
Sardello, Bert J. 
Sargent, Peter M. 
Sassano, Eugene 
Sauer, John P. 
Scaglia, Thomas N. 
Schaefer, Richard R. 
Scheetz, Gregory P. 
Scheetz, Lawrence F. 
Schenfeld, George 
Schieferecke, James A 
Schippers, John T, 
Schmirt,. Charles L. 
Schmitt, Henry W. 
Schmitz, Donald L. 
Schneider, Tom F. 
Schneringer, Ray F. 
Schooler, William C. 
Schreiber, Ron C. 
Schropfer, Jerome H. 
Schulte, John L. 
Schulte, Sr. M. Pauli 
Schwab, Peter A. 
Schwartz, Edward A. 
Schwartz, Ralph A. 
Sciortino, Sam C. 
Scott, Bruce T. 
Scott, John W. 
Secord, Roy W. 



36 

141 

35 

33 

141 

39, 141 

118 

142, 235 

36,40, 118 

56 

45, 118 

53, 142 

118 

118 



105 

105 

61, 118 

118 

54, 1 1 8 



142 
34,35 

61, 105, 183 



142 
142 



41 
142 



59 
105 
119 
57, 1 42 
142 



142 
119 



119 

38, 40, 48,54, 119 

47, 57, 142 

143 

143 
39, 143 
44, 105 
52,53, 143 
143 
49, 55 
32, 119 
49 
143 
143 
44, 105 
119 



119 

119 

48, 143 



52, 118 
141 



Seep, Albert E. 






143 


Seitz, Dennis J. 




120 


222 


Selak, Franklin J. 


39 


, 51 


143 


Sellers, Robert G. 






144 


Seymour, Gregory C. 








Shay, John F. 








Shea, John G. 






34 


Sheehy, Terrence C. 


42,68 


80, 


167, 






208, 


211 


Sherman, Jerome F. 


1 44, 208, 


211, 


214 


Sievers, James J. 






144 


Simons, Sr. M. Coleft 








Simons, Thomas F. 


46 


, 59, 


144 


Sims, Robert E. 






144 


Skoglund, Ronald L. 






120 


Smith, George A. 






144 


Smith, Jerry L. 


42, 144, 


219 


222 


Smith, Robert N. 






144 


Smith, Vincent L. 




34, 


105 


Somers, Gerald F. 








Spear, Ralph J. 






49 


Spensieri, Daniel A. 






49 


Sprehe, David L. 




58, 


106 


Springer, Lawrence J. 








Stancato, Joe E. 






144 



Stanley, Clifford V. 
Starbuck, Dennis E. 
Stark, John M. 
Stein, James B. 
Stein, Robert L. 
Stewart, Thomas B., Jr. 
Strub, Larry C. 
Sullivan, Joseph H. 
Sullivan, Thomas J. 
Summers, Stewart N. 
Swanson, Peter H. 
Swanson, Robert J. 
Sweeney, Roger L. 
Sweetman, Gerald P. 
Swift, Robert P. 
Swirczynski, John P. 
Swirczynski, Walt 
Synoground, Clifford 
Szalay, Gerard 

T 

Tafoya, Jose M. 
Tafoya, Robert E. 
Tarabino, John M. 
Tarabino, Joseph A. 
Tartaglia, Paul M. 
Tawson, Bruce T. 
Taylor, James B. 
Taylor, Robert L. 
Telatnik, Stephen C. 
Tellez, Jerry 
Tenderich, Fred 
Terrien, Stephen J. 
Theisen, George A. 
Theisen, Gerald B. 
Theisen, Richard A. 
Thomas, Clyde W. 
Thorsen, John D. 
Tierney, Sr. M. Consta 
Tobin, Frank J. 
Toepfer, David J. 
Tong, Jerry E. 
Tracy, Thomas 
Trenkle, John A. 
Turner, James P. 
Twining, George H. 



Valdez, Walter R. 
Veatch, John L. 
Vescovo, Robert E. 
Vifquain, Larry B. 
Vigil, Leopold J. 
Vitry, Dave L. 
Vostrejs, David L. 

w 

Wade, Charles G. 
Walker, Jean C. 
Wallner, Richard D. 
Walrond, Jerome R. 
Walsh, Thomas C. 
Wamser, Cornell J. 
Wanebo, Clifford K. 
Ware, Joseph H. Ill 
Warther, William R. 
Waters, James J. 
Weber, Hugo P. 
Weber, James 
Wells, Michael V. 
Welsh, Terrence 33, 

Welte, Lawrence E. 
Weskamp, Richard D. 
Wesley, Ben 
Wethington, William J. 
Wetzel, Jim M. 
Whelan, William J. 
Wickenhauser, Dennis 
Wilkinson, James A. 
Wilkinson, Raymond F. 
Williams, A. Kenton 
Williams, Johnnie 
Williams, Kenneth V. 
Williams, Michael R. 
Wilson, K. Michael 
Wise, Arthur N. 



Yacovetta, Donald F. 
Yax, James F. 
Yumich, George S. 



Zarlengo, Albert E. 
Zarlengo, Ernest P. 
Zarlengo, Mario H. 
Ziegler, Emil B. 
Zivic, William J. 
Zumtobel, Bert 







144 






120 






145 






106 






106 




44,47 






145 






45 






145 






120 






145 




44 


120 

145 
120 




35, 


145 
106 
145 
145 

145 
106 




43, 59 




43 


120 




145 


219 
54 


32 


. 61 


120 


, 59, 


146 


160 


36 


, 45 


106 


146, 


219 


231 



146,219 



146 

120 
120 
146 
35, 121,229 
34, 121 
146 
146 



39,48, 146 

47, 57, 121 

146 

147 

54, 147 

54, 147 



39,47,48, 147 

44,50 

147 

106 

71, 147 

52, 147 

32,65, 180,226 

121 



147 
36 
121 
60, 70,96, 106 
121 
121,211 

147 

107 

35, 40, 107 

107 
107 

121,214,218 
224 

147, 208, 219 
107 



49 
36,44, 121 



54, 121 

107 

49, 107 

107 

34 



Page 279 




the last word . . 



The last picture is captioned, the last copy is writ- 
ten and proofread, the last picture in place, the last 
staff member has left for bed and a well deserved 
rest. The darkroom stands deserted, the office is quiet, 
the finished pages are stacked ready to be shipped to 
the publisher. 

Another RANGER is completed and ready for its 
judges, the students, their approval is the only approval 
sought. In this book it is hoped that we have captured 
the life of the student body and that each individual 
student, whether he is a secluded scholar within a 
small circle of friends or an activities man whose name 
is familiar to most of the campus population will find 
himself represented somewhere in these pages. 

We have received much help in the completion of 
this book: from the student body which so willingly 
cooperated, from our moderator, Fr. Bocklage, who 
gave us his counsel and time, from the Dean of Men, 
Fr. Malecek, who aided us in tire selling of the books 
and took such a personal interest in the progress of the 
book, and from the staff which gave time and effort 
so unselfishly. 

This was a memorable year, a year which shall 
always be remembered by me. I would like to take 
this opportunity to thank those who gave me the op- 
portunity to assume the responsibility and leadership 
for the completion of the RANGER. 

The experience which I have gained in seeing 
this book to completion is of extreme value and will 
always be so. My thanks to the staff which proved 
itself capable, loyal and able during the long year. 
My best wishes go to the new staff and new editor. 




o 



Jim O'Connor 
Editor 



Page 280 



1 















.